Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 39
    #1

    Spring open

    Hi,
    One meaning of the word "spring" as a verb is "to be released suddenly from a constrained position".
    I've found one sentence to be the example: The door sprang open.
    In this case, if "open" is adj,
    1. Is "sprang" in this case a linking verb so "open" is adj?
    2. Or, there is "to be" omitted. The door sprang (to be ) open.
    Or, "open" is adv for the verb "sprang" ?
    Thank you

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: Spring open

    I don't consider "sprang" to be a linking verb. For me "sprang open" is a phrasal verb.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,825
    #3

    Re: Spring open

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    For me "sprang open" is a phrasal verb.
    'Phrasal verbs are idiomatic expressions, combining verbs and prepositions .'── quoted from https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/phrasal-verbs/

    Can 'verb + adjective' also be a phrasal verb?
    I am not a teacher.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #4

    Re: Spring open

    Phrasal verbs can also be verb + adverb. Open is closer to an adverb here.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,980
    #5

    Re: Spring open

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    'Phrasal verbs are idiomatic expressions, combining verbs and prepositions .'── quoted from https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/phrasal-verbs/

    Can 'verb + adjective' also be a phrasal verb?
    I, personally, don't consider 'spring open' to be a phrasal verb. However, there is no general agreement as to what exactly a phrasal verb is, so I can understand why some people would include 'spring open' in that class. I am not sure what word class label I'd attach to 'open' in 'spring open'. Given the choice between adjective and adverb, I'd probably go for the latter.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,888
    #6

    Re: Spring open

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I, personally, don't consider 'spring open' to be a phrasal verb.
    Are you a purist on the definition?

  5. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,980
    #7

    Re: Spring open

    There is little point in being a purist when so many writers use the term 'phrasal verb' in so many different ways. Personally, I reserve special labels for combinations of a verb and preposition/adverb/particle in which the combined meaning of the two-word phrase cannot easily be inferred from the normal meaning of the two words individually. As 'spring' is used about objects that open or move quickly and with a lot of energy (http://www.macmillandictionary.com/d...rican/spring_2), the meaning of 'spring open' is transparent, and so it is not a phrasal verb for me.

    For my personal views on multi-word v
    erbs, verbs followed by a preposition, prepositional verbs, and phrasal verbs, see https://www.usingenglish.com/articles/phrasal-verbs-multiword-verbs.html

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #8

    Re: Spring open

    Quote Originally Posted by joseph0928 View Post
    1. Is "sprang" in this case a linking verb so "open" is adj?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Joseph:

    A great American grammarian seems to agree with you.

    Dr. George Oliver Curme in his 1931 masterpiece A Grammar of the English Language (Volume II, page 37) gives this sentence:

    ""But, then, evening came, and the stars sprang alight." [He graciously gives credit for this sentence to one Sarah Gertrude Millin.]


    He considers this to be an example of copula + adjective.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #9

    Re: Spring open

    Perhaps "sprang" was a copula in 1931. It doesn't seem to be today.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,888
    #10

    Re: Spring open

    I am not greatly convinced that it is/was a copula verb. It strikes me as a lexical verb denoting the change, and rate of change, in the stars' appearance.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. open area/ open platform
    By tory in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 13-Jul-2014, 09:57
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-Jun-2014, 15:03
  3. Open ticket or open-ended tiket?
    By sebayanpendam in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 28-Jan-2013, 00:03
  4. wait for the gate of the lion's cage to spring open
    By iemmahu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2009, 13:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •