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    #1

    come through

    I like the teacher who has his own personality and doesn't hide it from the students so that he is not only a teacher but a person as well -- and it comes through the lessons. (How to Teach English, page 10, by Jeremy Harmer)

    What does it comes through the lessons mean in the above sentence?
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: come through

    It means that his personality is apparent to the students he is teaching. I think it is very badly expressed. It wouldn't give me much confidence in the quality of the book.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #3

    Re: come through

    Can the next patient come through please?
    http://www.memrise.com/mem/2432891/c...hrough-please/

    What does come through mean in the above sentence?
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #4

    Re: come through

    '...come through this door to see the doctor.'

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: come through

    I agree with bhai that it's badly expressed. If it said "that comes through in his lessons", it would be more understandable. This can be expressed as "that comes across in ..." too.
    Neither of them makes the rest of the sentence any better though.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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