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    #1

    If you hadn't lied to me

    If you hadn't lied to me before, I would have believed you.

    I understand have is used as an infinitive (main verb)in this sentence and not as a auxiliary verb. Am I correct. (I understand infinitive is the base case of the verb)

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    "Have" is an auxiliary verb there. The entire verb is "would have believed".

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    #3

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    Forget the idea of 'main verb''; it's not always helpful. The full/lexical verb in a verb phrase is the one that cariies the meaning of the event or state. If there is only one verb, that verb is the lexical verb:

    I am a teacher.
    Peter has a shower every merning.
    Carole
    lied to me
    They believed Emma's story.



    The primary auxiliary verbs are:
    DO (followed by the bare infinitive/base form of the lexical verb for negative, interrogative and emphatic constructions),
    HAVE (followed by the third form/past participle of the lexical verb for perfect constructions)
    BE (followed by the -ing form of the lexical verb for continuous/progressive constructions and by the third form/past participle of the lexical verb for passive constructions):

    I do not like you.
    Does he believe me?
    He does like his daily walk.

    Luke has lived in Isanbul for six years.
    If only I had known that.

    Lindsay is learning French.
    I was flying across the Atlantic at midday yesterday.

    Smoking is banned in public buildings.
    My father was killed in a car crash.


    We have had a lot of problems with our freezer.
    Joan is being rather naughty this week.

    We can use more than one of these verbs in the same construction:

    John has been working hard.
    Mary and Frank have been injured.



    Hvae you any questiions about that before we look at modals?

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    I consider the use of "main" verb to be useful. Changing its name to something else changes nothing. This is more terminology. What is the OP to do when he/she comes across "main verb" in a different place?

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    #5

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    I suggested the more formal grammatical words because I have occasionally seen 'main verb' used for the finite verb in a verb phrase. As Anil Giria seems rather confused about terminology, I thought it might be helpful to remove one possible area of confusion. That's all.

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    #6

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    [QUOTE=Piscean;1200825]Forget the idea of 'main verb''; it's not always helpful. The full/lexical verb in a verb phrase is the one that cariies the meaning of the event or state. If there is only one verb, that verb is the lexical verb:

    Mary and Frank have been injured.- Is it present perfect tense?
    We have had a lot of problems with our freezer.- Which tense is this?

    I understand that full verb/lexical verb is as good as main verb?


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    #7

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Have" is an auxiliary verb there. The entire verb is "would have believed".
    I understand, "I would have believed you" is modal perfect and in modal perfect "Have" is infinitive. Am I right?

    All modal perfect auxiliary verbs refer to the past.
    FORM: Modal + Have (Infinitive) + Past Participle

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    #8

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    "Have" is the base form (infinitive form) of the verb. It is not what we typically refer to as an infinitive. I know this terminology can be difficult and tedious.

  6. Piscean's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    Quote Originally Posted by Anil Giria View Post
    Mary and Frank have been injured.- Is it present perfect tense?
    Yes. present perfect passive.
    We have had a lot of problems with our freezer.- Which tense is this?
    It has a present-tense form of HAVE followed by a third form/past participle, so it must be present perfect. This form is active, not passive.

    I understand that full verb/lexical verb is as good as main verb?
    These are just different ways of labelling the verb that denotes the main situation.

    I sing.
    I am singing.
    I have sung.
    I have been singing.
    I will have sung.

    I hope to sing.
    I had hoped to sing.
    I have been hoping to sing.

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    #10

    Re: If you hadn't lied to me

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Have" is the base form (infinitive form) of the verb. It is not what we typically refer to as an infinitive. I know this terminology can be difficult and tedious.
    May I say that when we say " have" is the base case of the verb, we can't classify it into auxiliary verb. For eg: I have gone there. Here "have" is an auxiliary verb and not the main verb/base case of the verb. Am I right?

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