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    #1

    Question J. D. Salinger

    Hi, everyone! I am reading a short story by Sallinger "The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls" and there is a sentence I cannot understand. Therefore I kindly ask a native speaker to help with the exact meaning of it.

    The text is the following:
    "...one afternoon at the club when I was teeing off with H.B., just as I pressed my pin and ball into the hard, winter-rules ground and was getting into my stance..."

    I have underlined the parts which I cannot fully grasp the meaning. Any help with this will be highly appreciated. Thank you!

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: J. D. Salinger

    You can find the meanings here:
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/

    Look them up and post back if you're still having trouble with them.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: J. D. Salinger

    He is playing golf with H.B.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: J. D. Salinger

    These are all golf terms.
    "Teeing off" - taking your first shot of the whole.
    He is using the word "pin" to mean tee. You hold the ball and the tee in one hand and press it into the ground.
    It was winter - so the ground was hard. Some courses that stay open all year have different rules when the ground is harder from winter weather.
    When you tee off, you stand in a certain way to take your swing. He was getting into that position.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: J. D. Salinger

    Take care with the spelling of the surname. You spelt it correctly in your title but in your second sentence you wrote "Sall​inger".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Red face Re: J. D. Sallinger

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    These are all golf terms.
    "Teeing off" - taking your first shot of the whole.
    He is using the word "pin" to mean tee. You hold the ball and the tee in one hand and press it into the ground.
    It was winter - so the ground was hard. Some courses that stay open all year have different rules when the ground is harder from winter weather.
    When you tee off, you stand in a certain way to take your swing. He was getting into that position.
    Thank you so much, your answer helped me a lot!

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: J. D. Salinger

    Oops - hole, not whole.
    Embarrassed!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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