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    #1

    implied "like"

    Hi to everyone,
    I've got this sentence: "​The voice has come like a fire into my ears" for a song lyric. I need to know if it will still make sense if I remove "like" from it, if the "like" part of the phrase can be implied.
    The phrase would then sound like this: "The voice has come a fire into my ears", but I'm not sure if it is OK, even for a song.
    How bad is this?
    Thanks,
    Fabio
    Last edited by fbs88italy; 16-Nov-2015 at 20:54.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: implied "like"

    I am not a teacher.

    It's pretty bad actually.

    A metaphor you could use would be, 'the voice is a fire in my ears' or something along those lines.

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    #3

    Re: implied "like"

    Well, if it is pretty bad, that's it. I'll find something else. Thanks!
    Last edited by fbs88italy; 16-Nov-2015 at 20:53.

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    #4

    Re: implied "like"

    Quote Originally Posted by fbs88italy View Post
    Hi to everyone,
    I've got this sentence: "​The voice has come like a fire into my ears" for a song lyrics lyric. I need to know if it will still make sense if I remove "like" from it, if the "like" part of the phrase can be implied.
    The phrase should would then sound like this: "The voice has come a fire into my ears", but I'm not sure if it is ok OK, even for a song.
    How bad is this?
    Thanks,
    Fabio
    Quote Originally Posted by fbs88italy View Post
    yeah Well, if it is pretty bad, that's it. I'll find something else. Thanks!
    Remember to use correct capitalisation and punctuation at all times on this forum.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: implied "like"

    I don't agree that it's pretty bad.

    When it comes to song lyrics and poetry, few of us know for sure what works. "The voice has come a fire into my ears" sounds very strange to me - but the so did the lyrics of many very successful songs of the past that became very successful. When you are going outside the safe area of standard English, fbs88, there are no absolute rules.

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    #6

    Re: implied "like"

    The voice has come
    A fire into my ears


    Now they look like song lyrics.
    They look much better than 'The voice has come a fire into my ears'.
    (Strange to say, I even feel they might work well as song lyrics.)

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    #7

    Re: implied "like"

    The fact is that it has to be song without any pause. It could also be like "The voice has come / A fire into my ears", which actually is what I meant.
    But still, since I'm not a native, I don't want to decide if it is OK or not without asking first.

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    #8

    Re: implied "like"

    Re-read post #5. Song lyrics have no rules. Many of them are complete nonsense and a large proportion do not follow any sort of grammatical rules. The lyrics are usually written to fit the rhyme and rhythm of the music.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: implied "like"

    I agree with Roman in post #2. It is pretty bad.

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