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    #1

    Nice one!

    Hi,

    Do nice one! and great! mean exactly the same?

    A: Have you heard the news? Mark is not on the waggon any more.
    B: Great/nice one, let us invite him for a drink.

    Thanks a lot
    Not a Teacher

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Nice one!

    Both "Great!" and "Nice one!" are commonly heard in BrE. They're quite informal so it's odd to see either of them before "Let us ...". Usually, we say "Let's invite him ...".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Nice one!

    "Nice one" does not work for me there. It is often used to acknowledge an accomplishment of some kind. I see none there.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Nice one!

    'Wagon' is the more common spelling, especially in AmE.

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    #5

    Re: Nice one!

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Nice one" does not work for me there. It is often used to acknowledge an accomplishment of some kind. I see none there.
    If, say, he had given up drinking for a month and was going back out with his friends, who were glad to see him back in the bars, it would work for me in BrE.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Nice one!

    If "Nice one" weren't appropriate, then nor would "Great!" be. They both suggest that the speaker is happy to hear that Mark is off the wagon and has gone back to drinking alcohol.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Nice one!

    It may be my AmE ears, but I don't see "nice one" in that situation. "Great" expresses approval of the circumstance of the friend rejoining his friends.

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    #8

    Re: Nice one!

    We in BrE are quite happy with "nice one" even when there isn't a particular accomplishment. Possibly popularised by the Beatles all those years ago? And definitely informal.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Nice one!

    I agree with Mike.
    "Nice one!" is spoken to the person who accomplished something in the U.S.

    The whole things seems strange. Unless someone has given up alcohol for Lent or is temporarily taking medication that doesn't mix with alcohol, usually "falling off the wagon" means that someone with a drinking problem has been unable to not drink - not a situation that is "great!" at all.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Nice one!

    I agree with you about "great". I was taking it to mean that his friends were happy to have him back in the group.

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