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    #1

    Exclamation at the beginning or end of a sentence

    What would be correct? and why?

    Every day I go to work

    I go to work every day

    Tomorrow I will go to work

    I will go to work tomorrow

    Thanks for your time!!

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    #2

    Re: at the beginning or end of a sentence

    Welcome to the forum.

    With the appropriate punctuation mark at the end, they would all be correct.

    Why? Because they are. We are more used to telling you why sentences are incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: at the beginning or end of a sentence

    Some words and phrases are flexible with regard to their position in a sentence. There's no particular reason for this in many cases.

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    #4

    Re: at the beginning or end of a sentence

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Flash:


    I have found some information that has greatly helped me. May I share it with you?

    1. Adverbs of time "usually go in end position."

    a. "I'm flying to Edinburgh tomorrow."

    2. "They sometimes go in front position if we want to emphasise [emphasize] the adverb."

    a. "Today, I am going to clean the house."

    -- Google result: Cambridge Dictionaries Online.

    3. "Time adverbs can be in initial [front] position when we want to show a contrast [difference] with a previous reference to time."

    a. "The weather will stay fine today, but tomorrow it will rain."

    [Only my note: Do you see how "tomorrow" is put in front of "it will rain" in order to contrast "tomorrow" with "today"?]

    -- Google result: Position of adverbs BBC [British Broadcasting Corporation].

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