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    #1

    Question Affixes

    Words with affies -ian and -ish are part of a category such as;
    oldish, childish, foolish
    and
    Reptilian, equestrian

    However, in the following examples;


    1. The Canadian government uses a parliamentary system of democracy
    2. The Canadian bought himself a new car
    3. The prudish linguist didn't enjoy the film
    4. We keep those censored copies of the book available to protect the sensibilities of the prudish

    How would affix categories work here?
    I understand that the words function at nouns and adjectives in different contexts but how can we account for the fact the words in 1 and 3 end in -ian and those in 2 and 4 end in -ian?

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    #2

    Re: Affixes

    Hello cmackle; your question about different sentences seems to have got a bit mixed up. Can you untangle it?
    Why are you concerned about categories? Do you mean noun and adjective categories?

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    #3

    Re: Affixes

    Quote Originally Posted by Peedeebee View Post
    Hello cmackle; your question about different sentences seems to have got a bit mixed up. Can you untangle it?
    Why are you concerned about categories? Do you mean noun and adjective categories?
    When looking at standard English words containing affixes like -ian they are part of some sort of linguistic category in relation to the examples I gave. Their function changes from nouns to adjectives in different contexts. I'm trying to figure out this category.

    One type of category concerns the examples 1 and 2 whilst examples 3 and 4 are of a different category. I'm trying to understand this myself and come up with some sort of rule to apply when considering examples like these.

    Do you understand the different roles the words Canadian and prudish play in the examples?

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    #4

    Re: Affixes

    Certain word endings can sometimes (but not always) be indicative of an adjective.

    Consider:
    radish (n), polish (n,v), fish (n,v), nourish (v)
    thespian (n), technician(n), radian(n), librarian (n)

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