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    #1

    Adverbial phrase?

    Hi there.
    1. ''I wanted my first time to be with someone I cared about.''
    ''to be with someone I cared about'' = adverbial phrase?

    2. ''She does not want me to lie to her.''
    Is there an adverbial phrase in this sentence? Or indirect object?

    Thanks in advance.

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    #2

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Jason:

    1. Please study this sentence from one of my books: "The dean requested me to report at once." ***

    a. Do you feel (that) that sentence has the same structure as "She does not want me to lie to her"?

    b. IF you do, then here would probably be that book's explanation for your sentence:

    i. "Me to lie to her" is an infinitive clause/phrase. (The choice of word depends on your book/teacher.)
    ii. "Me" is parsed as the subject of "to lie to her."
    iii. You have probably already guessed that "me to lie to her" is the direct object of the verb "does want." ("Not" is an adverb. It is not parsed as a verb.)

    (P.S. In English, it does NOT sound natural to say something like: "She does not want that I should lie to her." Thus, speakers use the infinitive clause/phrase structure.)

    2. Here is something super important (from the same book).

    a. "We promised her to come."

    i. In that kind of sentence, "her" is NOT the subject of "to come."
    ii. "to come" is the direct object of "promised." ("We promised to come.")
    iii. You have probably already guessed that "her" is the indirect object."




    *** Pence and Emery, A Grammar of Present-Day English (1947).

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    I would like to add that "We promised her to come" is unnatural, in BrE at least. "We promised her that we would come" is how it's generally worded here. This might have something to do with the fact that The Parser's quote comes from a book written in 1947.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Jason:

    1. Please study this sentence from one of my books: "The dean requested me to report at once." ***

    a. Do you feel (that) that sentence has the same structure as "She does not want me to lie to her"?

    b. IF you do, then here would probably be that book's explanation for your sentence:

    i. "Me to lie to her" is an infinitive clause/phrase. (The choice of word depends on your book/teacher.)
    ii. "Me" is parsed as the subject of "to lie to her."
    iii. You have probably already guessed that "me to lie to her" is the direct object of the verb "does want." ("Not" is an adverb. It is not parsed as a verb.)

    (P.S. In English, it does NOT sound natural to say something like: "She does not want that I should lie to her." Thus, speakers use the infinitive clause/phrase structure.)

    2. Here is something super important (from the same book).

    a. "We promised her to come."

    i. In that kind of sentence, "her" is NOT the subject of "to come."
    ii. "to come" is the direct object of "promised." ("We promised to come.")
    iii. You have probably already guessed that "her" is the indirect object."




    *** Pence and Emery, A Grammar of Present-Day English (1947).

    Thanks for the explanation.
    Do you have any idea about sentence no 1?
    Because now I kind of think that ''to be with someone I cared about'' is an adjectival phrase.
    Last edited by jasonkhlim; 22-Nov-2015 at 03:31.

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    #5

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Jason:

    Excuse me for not addressing sentence #1 earlier, but one of the unwritten rules here is that we ordinary members should wait for a reasonable period before answering so that a teacher can answer first. Since it's been 24 hours since you first posted, I guess that I am allowed to timidly suggest a few ideas (not "answers").

    I think that there are two very convincing analyses. I shall use the one that pleases me more. When you get time, please read everything that you can in books and on the Web regarding the topic of infinitive phrases/clauses. You can then decide which analysis pleases you more.

    With your permission, I shall discuss a sentence similar to yours. (I do not think that it would be a good idea to discuss your original sentence. If you send me a personal message, I will explain why.)

    So let's work with this sentence that I have made up:

    "I wanted my first job to be with a company (that) I respected."

    COMMENTS:

    a. You feel that "to be with a company I respected" is an adjectival phrase.
    b. As you can see, "to be" is an infinitive. So I am 99.99% sure that "everyone" would agree that "to be with a company I respected" is an infinitive phrase/clause.
    c. Now here is my favorite analysis:

    i. I = subject.
    ii. wanted = verb.
    iii. my first job to be with a company I respected = an infinitive phrase/clause that is the object of the verb "wanted."

    Question: What did you want?
    Answer: My first job to be with a company I respected.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    I do not think that it would be a good idea to discuss your original sentence. If you send me a personal message, I will explain why.
    I think that in the twenty-first century we don't have to be shy about admitting that people have sex, James.

    ''I wanted my first time to be with someone I cared about.'' That utterance could well be a person's thoughts about their first time of having sex.

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    #7

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post

    i. "Me to lie to her" is an infinitive clause/phrase. (The choice of word depends on your book/teacher.)
    ii. "Me" is parsed as the subject of "to lie to her."
    iii. You have probably already guessed that "me to lie to her" is the direct object of the verb "does want." ("Not" is an adverb. It is not parsed as a verb.)
    I strongly disagree with your analysis.

    First, infinitives do not take subjects.
    Second, even if they did, the pronoun "me" as an object pronoun cannot be the subject of anything.

    I encourage you to come up with a different analysis.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 22-Nov-2015 at 15:21. Reason: Fixed quote box

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    #8

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Jason:

    Excuse me for not addressing sentence #1 earlier, but one of the unwritten rules here is that we ordinary members should wait for a reasonable period before answering so that a teacher can answer first. Since it's been 24 hours since you first posted, I guess that I am allowed to timidly suggest a few ideas (not "answers").

    I think that there are two very convincing analyses. I shall use the one that pleases me more. When you get time, please read everything that you can in books and on the Web regarding the topic of infinitive phrases/clauses. You can then decide which analysis pleases you more.

    With your permission, I shall discuss a sentence similar to yours. (I do not think that it would be a good idea to discuss your original sentence. If you send me a personal message, I will explain why.)

    So let's work with this sentence that I have made up:

    "I wanted my first job to be with a company (that) I respected."

    COMMENTS:

    a. You feel that "to be with a company I respected" is an adjectival phrase.
    b. As you can see, "to be" is an infinitive. So I am 99.99% sure that "everyone" would agree that "to be with a company I respected" is an infinitive phrase/clause.
    c. Now here is my favorite analysis:

    i. I = subject.
    ii. wanted = verb.
    iii. my first job to be with a company I respected = an infinitive phrase/clause that is the object of the verb "wanted."

    Question: What did you want?
    Answer: My first job to be with a company I respected.
    First of all, thanks for your explanation again. :)
    So you mean ''my first job to be with a company I respected'' is a direct object?
    But I was told that Infinitive phrases can act as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs and prepositional phrases can act as adjective and adverb.

    So, this is how I see it.
    I = subject
    wanted = verb
    my first job = object
    to be with a company I respected = ?
    Last edited by jasonkhlim; 22-Nov-2015 at 16:04.

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    #9

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonkhlim View Post
    (1) But I was told that Infinitive phrases can act as nouns.

    So, this is how I see it.
    I = subject
    wanted = verb
    my first job = object
    to be with a company I respected = ?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Jason:

    1. Yes, you are correct. An infinitive phrase/clause can act as a noun. As you know, a direct object is a nominative (like a noun). (E.g., "I want to eat some ice cream.")

    2. My analysis comes from many reputable books. Many teachers feel that it is the most logical.

    a. You have brought up the other equally good analysis.

    i. As you said, you may parse "my first job" as the direct object.

    (a) Then "to be with a company I respected" would be a so-called objective complement.

    (i) In other words, if you suddenly said "I wanted my first job," that sentence would confuse your listener. So you say "to be with a company I respected." It is called an objective complement because it refers to the object "job" and it "completes" the meaning of the sentence.

    (ii) As you can see, it starts with "to be," an infinitive. Thus, it is classified as an infinitive phrase/clause.

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    #10

    Re: Adverbial phrase?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Jason:

    1. Yes, you are correct. An infinitive phrase/clause can act as a noun. As you know, a direct object is a nominative (like a noun). (E.g., "I want to eat some ice cream.")

    2. My analysis comes from many reputable books. Many teachers feel that it is the most logical.

    a. You have brought up the other equally good analysis.

    i. As you said, you may parse "my first job" as the direct object.

    (a) Then "to be with a company I respected" would be a so-called objective complement.

    (i) In other words, if you suddenly said "I wanted my first job," that sentence would confuse your listener. So you say "to be with a company I respected." It is called an objective complement because it refers to the object "job" and it "completes" the meaning of the sentence.

    (ii) As you can see, it starts with "to be," an infinitive. Thus, it is classified as an infinitive phrase/clause.
    Hello, TheParser
    Can I say that "to be with a company I respected" functions as an adjective that modifies ''Job'' ?
    Same goes for my original sentence, which is ''I wanted my first time to be with someone I cared about.''
    Am I correct?

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