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    #1

    I cannot understand the structure of this phrase [The tensions rising]

    Hello,

    Would you please explain the structure of this phrase please?

    The tensions rising, the flood grows
    does it have the same meaning with the following phrases?

    1- The tensions that are rising

    2- The tensions that arises


    "The rising tensions" does make sense to me but the "The tensions rising" not.

    Thank you in advance,

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I cannot understand the structure of this phrase [The tensions rising]

    It is an absolute phrase. It acts as a modifier of the whole sentence.

    You can change the absolute phrase into a clause by inserting a verb into it.

    The tensions (are) rising; the flood grows. Clearly, the flood is causing tension.

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    #3

    Re: I cannot understand the structure of this phrase [The tensions rising]

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Lumia:

    I have found some information that may interest you.

    Please look at these two sentences:

    "The next minute Tom rushed out of the tent. A horde of mosquitoes was buzzing around his head."

    In other words, the mosquitoes were buzzing around Tom's head all the while [at the same time] he was rushing from the tent.

    Those two sentences come from a book for secondary students. They are good, clear sentences written in proper English.

    That same book then tells students that occasionally we can use an absolute phrase in order to make our writing sound more "vivid" [to produce an image in the mind].

    So it suggests this sentence:

    "The next minute Tom rushed out of the cabin, a horde of mosquitoes buzzing around his head."


    -- Corbin, Blough, Beek, Guide to Modern English (1965).

    NOTES:

    1. I used the name "Tom." The authors mentioned the name of an American comedian, whom you younger people would not know.
    2. Kindly remember that the (nominative) absolute phrase is usually limited to writing. One does not ordinarily speak that way.

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