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  1. denismurs's Avatar
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    #1

    take on its own momentum

    Hello,

    I can't find the meaning of the idiom: "take on its own momentum", could you help me with it. The context is:

    Dad had always wanted to sail across the Atlantic single-handed, but Mum discouraged him because she was worried. But he and I talked about it, and as I got better at sailing it kind of took on its own momentum. I was fourteen when I did it - but Dad followed me in a back-up boat to make sure I was all right.

    Does it mean that the long wished moment has come?

    Denis.
    FCE. I study Advanced.

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    #2

    Re: take on its own momentum

    No- it means the chatting and the increase in sailing skill began to work in the background and it seemed as if the decisions were happening automatically; as if the worries began to seem less worrying. It began to be an unstoppable plan.
    It's a very abstract idiom. The its in your question is the the idea/ the plan/ the adventure.

  2. denismurs's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: take on its own momentum

    Quote Originally Posted by Peedeebee View Post
    The its in your question is the the idea/ the plan/ the adventure.
    I think it is a personal pronoun which refer to object like her, him, his, it.
    I remember I saw the phrase: My cat has hurt his/its paw today.

    On my view the author talks about time span when he uses its.
    Last edited by denismurs; 26-Nov-2015 at 16:45. Reason: orthography
    FCE. I study Advanced.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: take on its own momentum

    Quote Originally Posted by Peedeebee View Post
    It's a very abstract idiom. The its in your question is the the idea/ the plan/ the adventure.
    I agree.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: take on its own momentum

    Definitely not time-span (except in the sense that the plan, gathering its own momentum, became clearer over time).

    b
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