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  1. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #1

    after the shipwreck not far away from Normandy's shore

    In 1064 after the shipwreck not far away from Normandy's shore, Harold, the Earl of Essex, was captured by William. He was released later on condition that he'd support William's claim to the British throne.

    I have several question concerning these two sentences. First of all, is there a word or a good phrase that can replace the bold part in the first sentence? I guess it's not a natural way to say it. Probably (in shore of Normandy) or something like that. I have no idea .

    Is it natural to say "claim to the British throne"? It's a literal translation from my mother tongue, so it might sound terrible to you.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #2

    Re: after the shipwreck not far away from Normandy's shore

    I wonder if off the coast of Normandy should do the trick.
    Last edited by Johnyxxx; 29-Nov-2015 at 01:29.
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  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: after the shipwreck not far away from Normandy's shore

    I was thinking the same thing as Johny, but you could qualify it with 'just off the coast' to make sure it's clear that the wreck is near the shore.

    As to your second question - yes, the phrase 'claim to the throne' is commonly used.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: after the shipwreck not far away from Normandy's shore

    Boris, I would go with Johny's suggestion "off the coast of Normandy". As to the second, your phrase works just fine.

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: after the shipwreck not far away from Normandy's shore

    Even the words "off Normandy" would do.

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