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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,554
    #1

    in American and British charts

    1) That was their only number one song in American and British charts.
    2) That was their only song that made it to number one in American and British charts.

    Do these sentences mean:
    a) No other song of theirs made it to number one both in American and in British charts.
    or:
    b) No other song of theirs made it to number one either in American or in British charts.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,903
    #2

    Re: in American and British charts

    It isn't 100% clear, but I would go more for

    1 a/b (though or would solve the problem)
    2 a (b seems less likely to me here)

    PS It should be the American and British charts.

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