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  1. denismurs's Avatar
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    #1

    someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    Hello,

    I need a help with these constructions:

    He has had his T-shirt changed because he got chocolate on it.

    Does this grammatical construction stand for that somebody have done something even though he didn't want to do it?

    And may I use such kind of construcction:

    I have to have my grassplot cut today because it's about time I had to do it.

    To express the same situation that somebody (in this case me) have done something even though he didn't want to do it?

    Denis.
    FCE. I study Advanced.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    There is no evidence in either case that the subject did not want the action to happen.

  3. denismurs's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    There is no evidence in either case that the subject did not want the action to happen.
    But still I think that it's a common construction in British English to express that somebody has done something without wanting it.
    Another sample could be: "He had to have a kindey removed."
    FCE. I study Advanced.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    That doesn't suggest he didn't want it either. In that example, it was a medical requirement. If there was something seriously wrong with his kidney, then he would want to have it removed!

    Note the correct spelling of kidn​ey.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    I don't think this has anything to do with BrE.
    Last edited by MikeNewYork; 02-Dec-2015 at 11:18. Reason: missing word

  6. denismurs's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    I'm just preparing for the Cambridge FCE and in the coursebook recommended by British Council the authers claim:

    - to say that someone else did something for you because you wanted them to. He had his hair cut specially for the interview.
    - to say that someone else did something to you even though you didn't them want to. She said she had had her necklace stolen.

    I think acccording to the coursebook they imply this sense. At the same time I understand that there is no any written evidence if the person wanted or not it to be done. So I needed to know your opinion about these constructions.
    Last edited by denismurs; 02-Dec-2015 at 10:57.
    FCE. I study Advanced.

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    There's nothing in the grammar that indicates whether the action is wanted or not.
    I assume you've either misread, misunderstood, or misquoted what was written.

  8. Piscean's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    - to say that someone else did something for you because you wanted them to. He had his hair cut specially for the interview.
    - to say that someone else did something to you even though you didn't them want to. She said she had had her necklace stolen.



    Both those explanations work in BrE; I don't know about other varieties. It seems from Raymott's post that it is not true of AusE.

    The second is an example of a moderately informal passive. The more formal way would be. She said that her necklace had been stolen. If you say that you had something done, (stolen in this case), you're giving an impression of 'This is what happened to me. Normally the utterance itself makes it clear that you did dot cause it to happen, though context may also help.

  9. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post

    - to say that someone else did something to you even though you didn't them want to. She said she had had her necklace stolen.

    .
    I don't understand your answer, Piscean.
    She said she had had her necklace stolen. - You imply that the grammar indicates that she didn't want it to happen.
    She said she had had her necklace polished. Does this mean that she didn't want it to happen? The grammar is the same.

  10. denismurs's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: someone did something even though I didn't want him to

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The grammar is the same.
    I think it's the matter of the point of view. For example now I live in Spain and in each spanish province the Spanish have their typical phrases with latent meaning which doesn't exist in others provinces or countries.

    For example: To be Celestina. In Spain means to be a pander, whereas for not-native speaker this expression doesn't seem to have any latent meaning or makes no sense.
    Last edited by denismurs; 02-Dec-2015 at 13:50.
    FCE. I study Advanced.

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