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  1. meliss's Avatar
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    #1

    the way he was baptised

    Hi. It's a story of a Slovak, Fedor Gal, of Jewish origin. He was born in March 1945 in the Terezín concentration camp
    where his family was deported. I do not understand the sense of the phrase "What it means to be evangelical, the way he was baptised, he will not learn on this Dante-esque road" in general, and "the way he was baptised" piece in particular. Can you help me, please? Thank you.

    "It is a story like in a film unwinding backwards. But what does this backward movement mean? At the beginning there is certainty – I was born, I survived, I am. At the end of the film a wrinkled uncertainty – who am I after all? This uncertainty is going to trouble Fedor until the end of his life; he just does not know about it yet. Because human identity is autobiographical. It is what is left at the end as the memory of life. All his life Fedor has known what it means to be a secular person. What it means to be evangelical, the way he was baptised, he will not learn on this Dante-esque road. It would have to be longer for that."

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    #2

    Re: the way he was baptised

    Did he convert to Christianity in the camp? I am not sure how "baptize" is supposed to be understood from just this excerpt.

    You understand Dante is famous for his "Inferno" which described the organization of hell?

  2. meliss's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 248
    #3

    Re: the way he was baptised

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Did he convert to Christianity in the camp?
    No, he didn't. Moreover, 'all his life Fedor has known what it means to be a secular person."

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