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  1. Skrej's Avatar
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    #21

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    What if somebody telehacks my brain, and takes control? Makes me run naked in traffic, drop a deuce on the neighbor's windshield, feel up a nun, or worse yet, vote Democratic?

    Legal defense of the future: "Your honor, that wasn't really me doing/saying that - somebody e-hacked my brain account."

    Judge: "You're certain that wasn't just drugs or alcohol?"

    Folks, be sure and set strong mental passwords, and change them every 6 months.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #22

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Turner View Post
    Several studies have been made about the possibilities of telecommunication.
    I see nothing wrong with this at all. But the original post is stuffed full of pseudo-scientific language to give it a gloss, but which is mostly fake- dropping the word quantum in at random does not make something an acceptable scientific theory. If science can demonstrate to its standards of objective reproduction that telecommunication exists, I would happily accept it, but there is a difference between the scientific investigation of the unknown and stuff knocked up in the world of the conspiracy theorists. Communication is a complex area, and it does take in areas that are not linguistic, but the post's statements like the one about "Quantum pseudo-telepathy, a phenomenon in quantum game theory.", which isn't even a sentence or vaguely comprehensible, do nothing to advance the idea that this is an area worthy of study. I do know that it is merely a copy and paste including the unnecessary links from a deleted Wikipedia article, but to post this as fact when it is, at best, unedited twaddle isn't advancing the case much. If someone wants to revolutionise human understanding of communication, very basic editing might be a good start. We're not talking peer-reviewed science here, just common sense. The communication revolutionary should be able to communicate.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #23

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    I agree. Most of the original was pseudointellectual gibberish.

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #24

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Saying something can make something true - performative verbs, for instance - but that does not extend to any texts simply because someone believes it. Like all conspiracy theory views of language, this one seemingly fails to convince anyone outside its immediate circle. I am prepared to be proved wrong in a few years, but would bet against it.

  5. Newbie
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    #25

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Science in its pure form does not create or reproduce telecommunication. It merely investigates the phenomenon. We already have a vague understanding of telecommunication as demonstrated in hypnosis, a form of mind control--although controversial--has some useful application. Medical research find that hypnosis (long distance or otherwise) can help people with chronic pain and even overcome addiction. It is not a cure per se but a procedure to suppress the brain receptors and “ignore” the pain-- thereby making the patient feel better.
    Science investigates what seems to lack proof that something exist.
    How can we know that something needs investigating if we discourage the assimilation of ideas that might be useful. When Nicola Tesla came up with the AC Theory (that eventually led to wireless technology), he was frowned upon and even labelled a crackpot. We won't be sitting in front of our computers if people who understood listened to those naysayers. Theories, knocked-up or conspiratorial allow us to walk away and become a little bit smarter.

    Quantum pseudo-telepathy, a phenomenon in quantum game theory” as used here is not a sentence per se, rather, one of the enumerated pseudo-sciences that include the talking horse, the Japanese Ishin-denshin telepathic theory). The word quantum in the (former phrase) acts as an adjective to describe a particular science (quantum pseudo-telepathy) while the latter phrase (a phenomenon in quantum game theory) serves as a modifier for the first phrase. Derived from Latin noun quantus (how much) .
    As used in this instance, it is an adjective which simply means a noticeable change, a sudden transition from usual same old same old. Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Computers, Quantum Physics etc.
    A lot of phrases sound gobbledygook for those not involved in a particular discipline. As part of the crowd looking in from the outside, we just need to embrace them with an open mind hoping that as we continue our education, we can finally say: “now I get it”.
    Yes I know that that article was lifted from a Linguistic Forum.
    I'm wondering how you determined that this is a copy/paste when you said it has been deleted. Be that as it may, doesn't mean much one way or the other.
    If the post did not fall under the realm of what you would consider common sense, portions of it could have been redacted instead of being met with hostility. What happened to the moderators when we needed them?
    Furthermore, the poster stated that he/she is a student learner. Could she/he be drafting a term paper that needs input from readers to expand somebody's article published in a learned journal? As a term paper, it merely suggest a presentation of a previous conducted research. This is different from treatise that requires scholarly qualities, and far from being a dissertation which is required in the pursuit of a doctorate degree, it simply allows the teacher to make any correction that it may require. I remember in high school years ago when my mom used to help me prepare my term paper whose deadline was fast approaching. There were pages in my paper with newspaper clippings. As kids who didn't know much about intellectual property, this procedure was and still is allowed in grade school.
    Whether the writing is a form of composition, the lowest form of treatise or dissertation that requires truthfulness is not important. This is a forum that tutors the use of English not a cadre of scientific experts and therefore not qualified to make judgment about the validity of the statements.

    Given the style, the expression and terminology, it suggest that the writer has the necessary tool to pursue something that is science-based—it is simply intended to develop critical thinking.


    Disambiguation is appreciated. As an aside: this comment will appear in my (private) Facebook account as a response to the argument.


    Thank you for the privilege.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #26

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    And yet, telepathy does not exist.

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #27

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Turner View Post
    I'm wondering how you determined that this is a copy/paste when you said it has been deleted.
    I searched in Google, found the Wikipedia reference, opened the link, and found that the page had been deleted. It wasn't rocket science, like the article.
    Last edited by Tdol; 07-Mar-2016 at 13:23.

  8. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #28

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Turner View Post
    A lot of phrases sound gobbledygook for those not involved in a particular discipline. As part of the crowd looking in from the outside, we just need to embrace them with an open mind hoping that as we continue our education, we can finally say: “now I get it”.
    Only if they are being used properly. I do not need to embrace anyone who uses the word quantum any more than I need to regard Star Trek and Doctor Who reversing the polarity of the neutron field as serious science to stop the time vortex- it's a narrative ploy.

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    #29

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I searched in Google, found the Wikipedia reference, opened the link, and found that the page had been deleted. It wasn't rocket science, like the article.
    Wikipedia, I have to admit, can really be an important addition in a plethora of resources necessary in conducting research. Even doctors use it.

    However, it is not immune to omissions, bias, even ambiguous and conflicting entries. Over-reliance on it can sometimes be hazardous to your health .

    Michael Gorman, the former president of American Library Association (ALA) stated in his blog:

    “A professor who encourages the use of Wikipedia is the intellectual equivalent of a dietician who recommends a steady diet of Big Macs with everything.”

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    #30

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I agree. Most of the original was pseudointellectual gibberish.
    Pseudo=pretentious, not real or fake. Along with gibberish (which makes it double negative) also denotes negativity, therefore the expression becomes positive. Not uncommon=common.

    Since you stated that “most was pseudo intellectual” (which means some are intellectual) , perhaps the quasi prefix would be more unambiguous.
    Except in some medical terms, pseudo prefix could denote positivity. Pseudoephedrine medication, pseudocolloid. A female illness.
    Quasi=resembling or half true. The quasi liberal freedom drafted by the Soviet Politburo.
    The quasi legal commission to investigate corruption.

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