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  1. Newbie
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    #31

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    And yet, telepathy does not exist.
    In response to your latest post, it is obvious that some degree of familiarity with the Japanese culture would help. The Ishin-denshin telepathyhas been practiced by the Japanese for centuries. So telepathy does exist. The equivalent of this in western culture is: “mutual understanding”-- the unspoken/unwritten communication between two negotiating parties.


    Before I get too deep into this, I must warn that mentioning cultures different from ours could easily be construed as racist. This not the intent.
    For the Japanese (and most Asian cultures), Ishin-denshin is much more reliable in terms of its trustworthiness as opposed to verbal communication because the verbal version can be susceptible to deception. This trait is often observed from most individuals who have deep roots in Asian culture. Because of this innate behavior, they are often judged stoic. On the contrary they are not.


    If you happen to be walking in front of a Korean shopper and he/she accidentally pushed the cart forward hitting your ankle, you know how painful it is (especially if you are wearing sandals) and could even tear your ankle tendons. The guy, instead of offering an apology would often display stern look on his face. This is not a display of indifference. He is communicating and accepting that he is at fault. He is sorry.
    In addition, since this happened unintentionally without malice, he will assume that you understood and expects that you will forgive him.


    Even in small towns in Romania where I briefly taught Math and Physics, I found most of the people in small villages practice something similar to Ishin-denshin. I would assume it is no different in big cities.
    In a nutshell, telepathy is universal.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #32

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Telepathy still doesn't exist.

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #33

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Turner View Post
    Wikipedia, I have to admit, can really be an important addition in a plethora of resources necessary in conducting research. Even doctors use it.

    However, it is not immune to omissions, bias, even ambiguous and conflicting entries. Over-reliance on it can sometimes be hazardous to your health .
    I didn't depend on it- I merely found that the original article had been deleted from it. But thanks for letting me know that it is not perfect; I would never have known.

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #34

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Turner View Post
    In response to your latest post, it is obvious that some degree of familiarity with the Japanese culture would help. The Ishin-denshin telepathyhas been practiced by the Japanese for centuries. So telepathy does exist. The equivalent of this in western culture is: “mutual understanding”-- the unspoken/unwritten communication between two negotiating parties.
    My wife is Japanese and she tells me that the supposedly telepathic elements you are referring too are not what the concept is about. Mind you, she is a scientist, so you could regard her as biased if you like. And you probably know more about Japanese culture.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #35

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Turner View Post
    The Ishin-denshin telepathyhas been practiced by the Japanese for centuries. So telepathy does exist.
    No. "Telepathy" has a meaning in English. What you are describing is not telepathy. You can't prove anything by equivocating on a word like that. The Rolls Royce Ghost exists, so ghosts exist, etc. No one here is going to buy that level of argument.
    What you are describing are cultural traditions and understandings. Have you heard of non-verbal communication? If you nod at an acquaintance in the street, that means something like 'Hello'. But the concept of 'Hello' is not transferred mentally; it is a cultural sign, just like waving, flipping the bird, smiling, etc. None of these require telepathy.

  6. Skrej's Avatar
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    #36

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Turner View Post
    Wikipedia, I have to admit, can really be an important addition in a plethora of resources necessary in conducting research. Even doctors use it.
    Not my doctor, because as soon as I discovered my doctor was relying on anything in Wikipedia for my medical treatment, he would no longer be my doctor.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  7. Newbie
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    #37

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    My wife is Japanese and she tells me that the supposedly telepathic elements you are referring too are not what the concept is about. Mind you, she is a scientist, so you could regard her as biased if you like. And you probably know more about Japanese culture.
    [Metaphorically speaking]


    Just because someone was born and grew up in Africa doesn't mean he knows everything about lions.
    As a matter of fact many children in Africa who've grown up in the same environment haven't even seen a lion in the wild--let alone know everything about the animal.


    Given their bigger chance of encountering a real lion, I'd be willing to give them the benefit of the doubt just as much to a guy living in the asphalt jungle of Brooklyn.


    Regards to your smart wife.

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    #38

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No. "Telepathy" has a meaning in English. What you are describing is not telepathy. You can't prove anything by equivocating on a word like that. The Rolls Royce Ghost exists, so ghosts exist, etc. No one here is going to buy that level of argument.
    What you are describing are cultural traditions and understandings. Have you heard of non-verbal communication? If you nod at an acquaintance in the street, that means something like 'Hello'. But the concept of 'Hello' is not transferred mentally; it is a cultural sign, just like waving, flipping the bird, smiling, etc. None of these require telepathy.
    If one encounters someone in the street, whether he is an acquaintance, a long-lost friend, estranged family member or even someone you've had an unamicable separation, the reaction is not always the concept of “hello”, rather, both individuals' first reaction is shock and the mind switches to overdrive. Do I have to hug this person, say hello or just totally ignore the encounter.


    Depending on how the disconnect was brought upon, the person[s] are confronted with a a rapid decision to make. These processes are all happening in split second inside a normally functioning brain--on both individuals. If you have a better word or meaning in English, let's have it.


    In this situation, acting one way or the other could mean big difference: from embarrassment and even save us from looking deranged if not handled properly. I would not recommend saying hello to someone with a blank stare on his face. And if this scenario were ever to happen you will understand why we need increased awareness that mental illness is a reality.
    I'm not here to convince anyone to what I accept that telepathy is something that science can possibly harness to benefit us all. We are all endowed with the prerogative to accept or not accept what we refuse.


    But let me tell you this:


    Your argument that telepathy doesn't exist is no more convincing that telepathy does exist.




    My best regards to friends in Wagga Wagga and the beautiful town of Katoomba.
    For those who are wondering, these are two places in Australia located west of Sydney. I spent two months there in 2011.

  9. Newbie
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    #39

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No. "Telepathy" has a meaning in English. What you are describing is not telepathy. You can't prove anything by equivocating on a word like that. The Rolls Royce Ghost exists, so ghosts exist, etc. No one here is going to buy that level of argument.
    What you are describing are cultural traditions and understandings. Have you heard of non-verbal communication? If you nod at an acquaintance in the street, that means something like 'Hello'. But the concept of 'Hello' is not transferred mentally; it is a cultural sign, just like waving, flipping the bird, smiling, etc. None of these require telepathy.
    If one encounters someone in the street, whether he is an acquaintance, a long-lost friend, estranged family member or even someone you've had an unamicable separation, the reaction is not always the concept of “hello”, rather, both individuals' first reaction is shock and the mind switches to overdrive. Do I have to hug this person, say hello or just totally ignore the encounter.


    Depending on how the disconnect was brought upon, the person[s] are confronted with a a rapid decision to make. These processes are all happening in split second inside a normally functioning brain--on both individuals. If you have a better word or meaning in English, let's have it.


    In this situation, acting one way or the other could mean big difference: from embarrassment and even save us from looking deranged if not handled properly. I would not recommend saying hello to someone with a blank stare on his face. And if this scenario were ever to happen you will understand why we need increased awareness that mental illness is a reality.
    I'm not here to convince anyone to what I accept that telepathy is something that science can possibly harness to benefit us all. We are all endowed with the prerogative to accept or not accept what we refuse.


    But let me tell you this:


    Your argument that telepathy doesn't exist is no more convincing that telepathy does exist.




    My best regards to friends in Wagga Wagga and the beautiful town of Katoomba.
    For those who are wondering, these are two places in Australia located west of Sydney. I spent two months there in 2011.

  10. Newbie
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    #40

    Re: Telelinguistics as a secondary bi-lingual communication

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    Not my doctor, because as soon as I discovered my doctor was relying on anything in Wikipedia for my medical treatment, he would no longer be my doctor.

    The American Medical Association (AMA) requires relicensing tests that are conducted regularly to make sure accredited doctors are up to date in analyzing data on electronic medical records, digital health care, telemedicine that includes data analytics to formulate impacts of several advances in the medical field. Wikipedia is a valuable resource to prepare doctors for this relicensing process because most of the information in Wiki are contributed by prominent doctors. Failure to comply (and pass the test) would jeopardize their right to practice the profession.


    This doesn't mean that they need to consult Wiki on how to operate on a patient or how and when to prescribe medication. They've already spent substantial amount of time and money to acquire the knowledge and become certified by AMA. I believe teachers are also subjected to this process. I know in my home state in several school districts, this is a requirement in order to hold their tenure.


    Of course if a practicing doctor graduated from the “old school”, he may not have the skill to run a computer— a good reason enough to preclude him from accessing Wikipedia.


    I hope your doctor doesn't belong to this breed. And if he is, I wish you well.

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