Page 2 of 8 First 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... Last
Results 11 to 20 of 73
  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 8,311
    #11

    Re: present participle

    I think it should be 'hid' instead of 'was hiding'.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hebrew
      • Home Country:
      • Israel
      • Current Location:
      • Israel

    • Join Date: Aug 2014
    • Posts: 204
    #12

    Re: present participle

    Two questions, if you think so.
    1. Do you think that this sentence is not correct? the writer would need to use hid and not "ing" here?
    2. What is the difference between was+hiding and hid(past simple)?

  3. VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,471
    #13

    Re: present participle

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Captain:

    Of course, I cannot answer your great question, but here are some comments from one author. (I guess that we should respect his ideas, for he was a professor of English at the University of Kansas, and he was also a guest professor at the University of Oslo.)

    "Hearing a step, I turned."

    1. He does not accept the usual explanation that "hearing a step" modifies "I."

    2. He thinks that it has the force of an adverb clause. He suggests three possibilites:

    a. When I heard a step, I turned.
    b. After I heard a step, I turned.
    c. Because I heard a step, I turned.


    3. He then asks: Does "a," "b" or "c" come closest to the meaning of "Hearing a step, I turned"?

    a. His answer: "The answer is that it makes no difference."

    *****

    Let's look at your sentence: "He managed to escape for several months, hiding with a sympathetic family."

    a. If the -ing word did not exist, how would you express the idea contained in "hiding with a sympathetic family"?

    i. I have an idea, but I will keep it to myself, lest I misguide you.

    ii. I do think, however, that it is accurate to say that we might have to use some kind of adverbial clause.

    -- That book is Making Sense of Grammar (1980) by John Clark Jordan, page 100.
    Last edited by TheParser; 08-Dec-2015 at 16:04.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,583
    #14

    Re: present participle

    There is no way that "hearing a step" is a clause. It has no subject or verb. It is a participial phrase and it does modify "I".

  5. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 15,502
    #15

    Re: present participle

    In some schools of grammar, 'hearing a step' is considered an adverb(ial) clause. "Similarly, the verbless clause obdurate as stone in the sentence Obdurate as stone, the man withstood all pleas can be analysed as consisting of a subject complement, corresponding to the analysis of The man was obdurate as stone. In such a description, sentences are classified by form into three types: finite clauses; non-finite clauses (infinitive and participle clauses); verbless clauses"

    Clause. Greenbaum, S in McArthur Tom (ed) (1992), The Oxford Companion to the English Language, OUP


    The re-defining of such words as phrase and clause in recent years can be a little confusing for learners, but we can't close our eyes to its happening. Actually, it's not a serious problem for people who are learning to communicate in English. It's a problem only if students have to label words and groups of words.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,583
    #16

    Re: present participle

    Then the redefining was not needed.

  7. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 8,311
    #17

    Re: present participle

    Quote Originally Posted by captain1 View Post
    1. Do you think that this sentence is not correct? the writer would need to use hid and not "ing" here?
    I think both 'and hid' and ', hiding' are correct.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 15,502
    #18

    Re: present participle

    Quote Originally Posted by captain1 View Post
    According to my understanding, this ing would need to be: tense(was)+ing but the writer wanted to shorten the line, so he deleted it.
    Here, the sentence would need to be "was+hiding" but the writer has wanted to omit it. Am I right?
    No. The writer is using a participle construction. He is not 'shortening' a past continuous construction.

  9. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hebrew
      • Home Country:
      • Israel
      • Current Location:
      • Israel

    • Join Date: Aug 2014
    • Posts: 204
    #19

    Re: present participle

    I was googling "present participle" and haven't found an article about this particular form. Maybe because I don't understand this properly.
    Someone can help me?
    Thanks

  10. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,583
    #20

    Re: present participle

    What do you mean by "this particular form"? This use of a present participle is very common.

Page 2 of 8 First 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •