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    #1

    Question the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty

    Hi,

    I found the following "premise" example sentences from Longman dictionary.

    1). The idea that there is life on other planets is the central premise of the novel.
    2). the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty.

    In the first examlple, the premise is an idea.
    But in the second examlple, I don't think it is a complete sentence because the structure is:
    the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty.

    There is no object in the second example, is it correct?

    Thanks.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty

    The second example is not a full sentence. Was that the question?
    It is a correct illustration of the word "premise", however.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty

    I consider the second example to be a noun phrase.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty

    As Raymott said, it's a good example but it's not a sentence - which explains the lower-case 't'. If the 'T' had been capitalized, there would have been other typos too: 'They presume that...'

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  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty

    Quote Originally Posted by fenglish View Post
    There is no object in the second example, is it correct?
    I think there is no object in the first example either because the noun phrase used after the linking verb there is a subject complement.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty

    One for your vocabulary notebook, Matthew: when you admit that someone else as made a valid point (as fenglish might) you can say Touché - fencing jargon, admitting a (slight) hit. Stress as French (but with English phonemes): /tu:'ʃeɪ/

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    #7

    Re: the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think there is no object in the first example either because the noun phrase used after the linking verb there is a subject complement.
    The first sentence has the object, see below partition:
    The idea that there is life on other planets is the central premise of the novel.

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: the premise that an accused person is innocent until they are proved guilty

    'Is' is a linking verb, which takes a subject complement instead of an object.
    I am not a teacher.

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