Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia

    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,247
    #1

    Types of adverbials with "with"

    Dear teachers,

    Can sentence elements starting with the prepositional phrase "with..." be analysed in different ways?
    Please correct my analysis.

    1) This chap went on a free luxury holiday without his wife.
    = Subject, Intransitive/Intensive Verb (?), Adverbial of place, Adverbial of Accompaniment.

    Is the verb "went" considered as an intransitive or a copular verb here?
    Is the adverbial of place obligatory?

    2) All the people that were left behind became infected with the virus.
    a) Subject, Copular Verb, Subject Complement (infected + with the virus)
    b) Subject Copular Verb, Subject Complement, Adverbial of means/intrument (?)

    Best regards

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    1) "Went" is an intransitive verb there, not a copular verb. I would not call the adverb obligatory.

    2) You skipped the relative clause.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #3

    Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    I don't think we have adverbs of accompaniment in English as you do in Arabic. I would call that an adverbial of manner.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #4

    Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    Quote Originally Posted by hela View Post

    1) This chap went on a free luxury holiday without his wife.
    Adverbial of Accompaniment.






    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Helo, Hela:

    I have checked my books, and it appears that "without his wife" in your sentence can, indeed, be parsed as an adverbial of attendant/accompanying circumstances.

    Here are some citations that may interest you.

    1. "His relatives, with much satisfaction, saw him leave the village."

    a. That book says that "[A]n adverbial element may indicate accompanying circumstances: that is, certain actions or circumstances that occur at the same time as the action represented by the verb."

    Source: Walter Kay Smart, English Review Grammar (1940), page 219.

    2. "Louise came to the party with Alex."

    a. That book calls that an adverbial of accompaniment.

    Source: Bruce L. Liles, A Basic Grammar of Modern English (1979), page 26.

    3. "I went to town with John."

    a. That book tells us that we can often state such a sentence with two clauses.

    i. It suggests this version: "John went to town, and I accompanied him."

    Source: Celce-Murcia and Larsen-Freeman, The Grammar Book / An ESL/EFL Teacher's Course (1983), page 260.

    (As you know, the rules applying to "with" in such sentences also apply to "without.")

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #5

    Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    Does anybody else here think that classifying adverbs into types is rather useless? I am usually happy when a learner recognizes an adverb. I don't think a specific type adds anything, not to mention that there will disagreements about the types.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia

    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,247
    #6

    Question Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    Happy new year to all of you.

    Dear The Parser,

    What is your opinion about the second sentence ?
    Is it possible to include the relative clause in the subject or should it be analysed separately ?

    Thank you very much for your help.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #7

    Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Happy 2016 to you, too, Hela. May you have a healthy and prosperous year!

    Thank you so much for your first post. I learned so much while researching the answer.

    I shall pass on your latest question because I do not have the confidence to answer. As you know, we non-teachers are allowed to post answers only if we are reasonably confident (in my case, I always try to find authorities to back up my comments).

    I am sure that some other members will soon answer you.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #8

    Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    Parsing can be done at several levels. I don't consider the relative clause to be part of the subject. It functions as a modifier of the subject.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia

    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,247
    #9

    Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    Good morning

    So should "that were left behind" be analysed as an adjectival clause composed of:
    that = subject
    were left = intensive verb
    behind = obligatory adverbial related to the subject ?

    Have a good day

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #10

    Re: Types of adverbials with "with"

    What is an intensive verb?

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. "... two kind/types/sorts/varieties of fear"?
    By Odessa Dawn in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Feb-2015, 12:51
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2012, 04:23
  3. [General] Is it "type" or "types" ?
    By lam yin in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Mar-2011, 08:11
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Sep-2008, 11:33
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •