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    #1

    use of "in the way" or "like"

    My younger brother reads newspaper as if he is reading a novel. He doesn't want to skip any single column. When he starts to read a newspaper, he reads every column as if he will have to know every single news of the world. It causes a great wastage of time. Then I said him-

    "Don't read newspaper like you would read a novel"

    I think meanings of the following two sentences are same to the previous one.
    1. Don't read newspaper in the way you read novels.
    2. Don't read newapaper like reading a novel.

    Do you think that these three sentences work for this cases?
    Last edited by Azah; 08-Dec-2015 at 14:00.

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    #2

    Re: use of "in the way" or "like"

    Have you an answer to my question in post #11 here?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: use of "in the way" or "like"

    Quote Originally Posted by Azah View Post
    My younger brother reads newspaper​s (or "a newspaper") as if he is reading a novel. He doesn't want to skip any a single column. When he starts to read a newspaper, he reads every column as if he will have has to know every single piece of news of in the world. It causes a great wastage waste of time. Then I said to him "Don't read a newspaper like you would read a novel."

    I think the meanings of the following two sentences are the same to as the previous one.

    1. Don't read newspapers in the way you read novels.
    2. Don't read newsspapers like you are reading a novel.

    Do you think that these three sentences work for this cases case?
    With my amendments above, they could all be used. My preference is for "Don't read a newspaper like you're reading a novel".

    Of course, it's entirely up to him how he reads a newspaper so I wouldn't demand that he stop.

    (Cross-posted with Rover. Please respond to his question first.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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