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    #1

    Grammar- a friend of Tom's OR a friend of Tom

    Hello,
    Which one is right, he is a friend of Tom's OR he is a friend of Tom.
    Thanks in advance

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Grammar- a friend of Tom's OR a friend of Tom

    They are both correct, although I much prefer the latter.

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    #3

    Re: Grammar- a friend of Tom's OR a friend of Tom

    I prefer 'a friend of Tom's', because I'd say 'a friend of mine' rather than 'a friend of me'.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Grammar- a friend of Tom's OR a friend of Tom

    I use "friend of mine". But I stay away from things such as "friend of my father's.

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    #5

    Re: Grammar- a friend of Tom's OR a friend of Tom

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    They are both correct
    They are.

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    #6

    Re: Grammar- a friend of Tom's OR a friend of Tom

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Ioujj:

    In my opinion:

    1. In formal writing (a university report, a business letter, etc.), I would definitely feel more comfortable writing, "As a friend of Tom, I can tell you that he is an ethical person who deserves this position."

    2. In ordinary conversation, I have heard the so-called "double possessive" so often in my 70+ years that I would say, "As a friend of Tom's, I resent your nasty words about him."

    *****

    A few years ago, I also found another opinion:

    3. "I am a friend of Eliot's." = Eliot regards me as a friend (of his).
    4. "I am a friend of Eliot." = I regard Eliot as a friend (of mine).

    [IF -- if! -- you buy that opinion, then I think that people who personally know Her Majesty would say, "I am a friend of Queen Elizabeth's." I, of course, would merely say, "I am a friend [supporter/ fan] of Queen Elizabeth." That is to say, I admire her or approve of her views, but -- of course -- she has never heard of me!]

    The source for #3 and #4: Re: Friend of yours www phrases.org uk.
    Last edited by TheParser; 10-Dec-2015 at 14:30.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Grammar- a friend of Tom's OR a friend of Tom

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    They are both correct, although I much prefer the latter.
    Interesting, coming from a native speaker. I, on the hand, much prefer the former. Illogical as it is, I feel it is preferable and can never be wrong because I learnt it when I was two.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Grammar- a friend of Tom's OR a friend of Tom

    I reject it because it is illogical. In most cases (pronouns excluded) it makes little sense.

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