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    #1

    They nosed out the secret.

    Hello seniors and teachers,
    I am wondering if "out" in the sentence is functioning as a preposition! if not, then (politely) why? Grammatically, a preposition should be followed by its object, unless if it's at the end of a sentence.

    For example: What do you want it for? ( "for" preposition at the end of the sentence), right?

    So, what about;? "They nosed out the secret". ("out" preposition followed by its object).

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    "nose out" is a phrasal verb. There was a secret, they nosed it out.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    I would not call "out" in "nose out" a preposition. The prhrasal verb "nose out" acts transitively and "the secret" is the object.

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    #4

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    With phrasal verbs, some people call the words prepositions even though they aren't functioning as such, while others use terms like particles, which can be subdivided into adverbial and prepositional particles. With intransitive phrasal verbs, we have words which are commonly thought of as prepositions clearly not behaving as such because they're not connecting anything, but many people still happily call them prepositions, though purists generally don't.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    I don't know about being a purist, but I like the word "particle". For one thing, if somebody says I shouldn't put a preposition at the end of a sentence I can tell them it isn't a preposition; it's a particle.

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    #6

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    With phrasal verbs, some people call the words prepositions even though they aren't functioning as such, while others use terms like particles, which can be subdivided into adverbial and prepositional particles. With intransitive phrasal verbs, we have words which are commonly thought of as prepositions clearly not behaving as such because they're not connecting anything, but many people still happily call them prepositions, though purists generally don't.
    Hello,
    Would you like to give an example for each, particle, adverbial and prepositional particle, intransitive phrasal verb, (quoting)(we have words which are commonly thought of as prepositions clearly not behaving as such because they're not connecting anything, but many people still happily call them prepositions, though purists generally don't)?
    Regards!
    Last edited by Babarbutt; 18-Dec-2015 at 21:39.

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    #7

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    I don't know about being a purist, but I like the word "particle". For one thing, if somebody says I shouldn't put a preposition at the end of a sentence I can tell them it isn't a preposition; it's a particle.
    Surely if someone tells you you shouldn't put a preposition at the end of a sentence, you just tell them they're wrong!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    But in this case, it is not a preposition.

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    #9

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    Quote Originally Posted by Babarbutt View Post
    Hello,
    Would you like to give an example for each, particle, adverbial and prepositional particle, intransitive phrasal verb, (quoting)(we have words which are commonly thought of as prepositions clearly not behaving as such because they're not connecting anything, but many people still happily call them prepositions, though purists generally don't)?
    Regards!
    Think of the difference between make up in these two sentences:


    They had an argument but have made up. (Intransitive- no object)
    He made up the story. (Transitive- the story is the object)

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    #10

    Re: They nosed out the secret.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Think of the difference between make up in these two sentences:


    They had an argument but have made up. (Intransitive- no object)
    He made up the story. (Transitive- the story is the object)
    In the first example "made up" means solved their problems, became friends again or forgave each other.
    In the second example it means invented or imagined the story.

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