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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Question Some questions about some "mistakes"

    Hi there, I want to ask you something about the mistakes I made in my last exam.
    First of all you need to know that my English teacher is very... one sided. She only accepts the solutions she gave us, alternative solutions are not accepted mostly.

    Task 1 - Put the sentences into passive.
    (1) They awarded Tony the first prize in the essay competition.
    (5) They told me to sit down and wait.

    My approach:
    (1) Tony has been awarded with the first price in the essay competition.
    (5) I have been told to sit down and wait.

    She said, it has to be "was" instead of "has been" in both sentences. I earned no points for both sentences, but is it just a serious mistake or is it possibly right?

    And there is another thing I'm frustrated about.

    Task 3 - Translate into English.

    It's difficult to describe it unless you can't speak German, but I'll try it anyway.

    Here is my approach:
    They requested him not coming to late.

    The only thing I want to know here is if this sentence is right or wrong.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Akubus View Post
    Task 1 - Put the sentences into passive.
    (1) They awarded Tony the first prize in the essay competition.
    (5) They told me to sit down and wait.

    My approach:
    (1) Tony has been awarded with the first prize in the essay competition. Your teacher is right.
    "They awarded Tony..." becomes "Tony was awarded."
    "They have awarded Tony.." would be "Tony has been awarded."


    (5) I have been told to sit down and wait.
    Same. They told me = I was told.
    They have told me = I have been told.

    She said, it has to be "was" instead of "has been" in both sentences. I earned no points for both sentences, but is it just a serious mistake or is it possibly right?
    Your choice of tense is incorrect - this is not a matter of a teacher being overly picky.

    And there is another thing I'm frustrated about.

    Task 3 - Translate into English.

    It's difficult to describe it unless you can't speak German, but I'll try it anyway.

    Here is my approach:
    They requested him not coming to late.

    The only thing I want to know here is if this sentence is right or wrong. It's not right, but I'm not sure what it should be.
    They requested that he not come in too late?


    Thanks in advance!
    Please see above.

    And welcome to the forums!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    They asked him not to come in late.

    or

    They asked him to come in on time.

  4. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    I think it is: They wanted him not to come to late (Could you correct the sentence if there is a mistake in it?)

    But I want to know if "They requested him..." is also ok, because my English teacher says it is wrong. She only accepted "They wanted him to". In the German sentence there is the verb "baten", which is the past form of "(jemanden) bitten". Translated into English "bitten" is "(to) request" (according to dict.cc)

    It should be right but my stubborn teacher does not even allow me to explain it to her :/

    Oh and @Barb_D
    It is "price" in British English (That's the English we learn) and "prize" in American English, but thanks :)

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    It is "prize" in both British and American English. (And in all other varieties of English.)
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    "They wanted him not to come to late." This is meaningless.
    "They requested him..." is incorrect.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  7. Piscean's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Akubus View Post
    I think it is: They wanted him not to come to late (Could you correct the sentence if there is a mistake in it?)
    ...too late ...
    But I want to know if "They requested him..." is also ok, because my English teacher says it is wrong. She only accepted "They wanted him to". In the German sentence there is the verb "baten", which is the past form of "(jemanden) bitten". Translated into English "bitten" is "(to) request" (according to dict.cc)
    'They requested him' is OK, but 'They asked him' is more natural, in my opinion.

    Oh and @Barb_D
    It is "price" in British English (That's the English we learn) and "prize" in American English,
    No. It's 'prize in both varieties. The price of something is how much you pay for it.

    ps. Crossposted with bhai
    Last edited by Piscean; 17-Dec-2015 at 16:12. Reason: ps. added

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    #8

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    I don't like "they requested him."

    Requested of him...
    Requested that he...
    Asked him...

  8. Newbie
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    #9

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "They wanted him not to come to late." This is meaningless.
    Meaningless in the sense of what? Is it "bullsh*t" (so to speak)?

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    ...too late ...
    I'm sorry. Sitting in the bus I wrote it with my smartphone a few hours ago.
    'They requested him' is OK, but 'They asked him' is more natural, in my opinion.
    Okay, that's fine. I was so focused on "request" that I forget about phrases like "Want sb. to do sth."
    No. It's 'prize in both varieties. The price of something is how much you pay for it.
    Well, my teacher wrote it that way on my testpaper: "price". So, a price is the value I need to pay, right? And a prize is an award that somebody could win, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I don't like "they requested him."
    Neither do I ^^
    Requested of him...
    Requested that he...
    Asked him...


    I have another question.

    Task 5 - Correct the mistakes.


    (4) 330 million tonnes of toxic waste are produced from industry every year.

    I wrote the following:

    (4) 330 million tons1 of toxic waste are produced by the2 industry every year.

    1 I did not find the phrase "tonnes" in the dictionary but instead I found "tons". My teacher has crossed out "tons" and (again) wrote "tonnes" instead. Isn't "tons" a valid phrase?
    2 I was not sure here, but I think my teacher is right (She has crossed it out and marked it.).
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 17-Dec-2015 at 23:12.

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    #10

    Re: Some questions about some "mistakes"

    Please start a new thread for the unrelated Task5, with the title tons/tonnes.

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