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    #1

    is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    Hello.

    Ships that come to our shipyard undergo a lot of tests. One of them is a test of the rudder. This is where my question comes.

    Does "put the rudder over" mean the same as "make an attempt to lay the rudder"?

    What do you think?

    Thank you.

  1. Skrej's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    If you mean to place the rudder on its side, then neither one makes sense. However, I suspect these may be nautical phrases I'm simply unfamiliar with, in which case I can't answer your question.

    I'm a born and bred landlubber, so perhaps some salty dog will happen along to help you out.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #3

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    Any reply from a rudder expert would be welcome.

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    #4

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    I tried googling "lay the rudder" but could not find many results supporting its use as a phrase. What is it supposed to mean?

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    #5

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    It means "push it to the extreme right and extreme left".

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    #6

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    You seem to have answered your own question, then.

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    #7

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    Piscean has some salty sea-dog knowledge- maybe he can confirm it when he's next in.

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    #8

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    Does it mean that "make an attempt to lay the rudder" = "put the rudder over /hard/" = "push the rudder to the extreme right or left"?

    I would be grateful for a reply?

    Thank you.

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    #9

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    To put something over exists as a phrasal verb, but it's totally wrong for your context, I'm afraid.
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...something+over
    Where did you actually come across "put the rudder over?"
    Again, I googled "put the rudder over", and it appears to mean "move it in a particular direction." In other words, it seems to be an operational rather than a maintenance phrase.
    You can do the google search yourself. Just type "put the rudder over" (with the double quotation marks) and have a read of some of the results.
    I hope that's of some help.

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    #10

    Re: is "make an attempt to lat the rudder" equal to "put the rudder over /hard/

    I found it by typing "putting the rudder over" on the Internet.

    Could you tell me if the 3 above-mentioned rudder-related phrases in post 8 mean the same?

    Thank you.

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