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    #1

    Why do Americans ignore the "T" in words?

    Ex.
    Center: Cenner
    Santa: Sanna
    Quentin (My name): Que-in
    Button: Buh-in

    Just wondering, why do Americans do this? The only people I've seen pronounce words like that are Americans, so why do we do this? Does anyone know?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Why do Americans ignore the "T" in words?

    It's not a question of ignoring a letter. It's simply a case of pronunciation. I find the first two of your examples fairly common but I've never heard an American say "Que-in" nor have I have heard anything that sounds like "buh-in". In both AmE and BrE, the "tt" in the middle of "button" is frequently swallowed.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Why do Americans ignore the "T" in words?

    Americans do not frequently swallow t's. There are times when the t is not fully pronounced. The only people I have ever heard pronounce button as buh-in are British.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Why do Americans ignore the "T" in words?

    In another thread, I've recently given an example of an American machine saying the opposite, i.e. using the glottal stop. When somebody programs a machine to pronounce something, I think that means it is very common.

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    #5

    Re: Why do Americans ignore the "T" in words?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    The only people I have ever heard pronounce button as buh-in are British.
    Many do that in the UK, though others shudder.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Why do Americans ignore the "T" in words?

    My least favorite is "bottle" as "bah ul".

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    #7

    Re: Why do Americans ignore the "T" in words?

    Having lived in London, or Lahndahn as it is known, as an outsider, I rather like it.

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