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    #1

    Fight in your case

    Hello,


    Can anybody tell me if fight in your case means fight for you in the text below?

    "I bent on my right knee to her. `I take you,' I said, `to be my lady, to fight in your cause, to honour
    and love you for ever.'


    Aleister Crowley, The Dream Circean, 1910

    Thanks a lot.
    Not a Teacher

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Fight in your case

    Well, the quote (as you correctly wrote in the quote) is "... in your cause". You wrote "case" in your title and in your first question. It means that he will fight for things that are important to her, things that she wants/needs, things that she believes in.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Fight in your case

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Well, the quote (as you correctly wrote in the quote) is "... in your cause". You wrote "case" in your title and in your first question. It means that he will fight for things that are important to her, things that she wants/needs, things that she believes in.

    My fault, it should have been cause.
    Not a Teacher

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Fight in your case

    These days, it would probably be worded "to fight for your cause", or even "fight your corner".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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