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    #1

    Without a close

    Hello,

    Does without a close mean without a fence/railings?

    No bell, as a matter of fact, loosed its tongue that stagnant half-hour. Unless then the walls beneath me already concealed a few such chance visitors as myself, All Hallows would be empty. A cathedral not only without a close but without a congregation--yet another romantic charm.

    Walter de la Mare, All Hallows, 191?

    Thanks a lot.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 06-Jan-2016 at 15:18. Reason: Removed unnecessary line breaks and formatting
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  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Without a close

    Dictionaries list archaic usages, and I am fairly sure this is one of those.

    www.dictionary.com

    Def.: an enclosed place or enclosure, esp. one about or beside a cathedral or other building.
    Last edited by Tarheel; 05-Jan-2016 at 18:58.

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    #3

    Re: Without a close

    It's not an archaic usage of this definition of 'close' from the dictionary linked to above:

    an enclosed place or enclosure, especially one about or beside a cathedral or other building.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Without a close

    That is true. It's not listed as archaic.

    (The word "close" is an interesting one. It's a noun, a verb, an adjective, and an adverb.)

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Without a close

    Although as a verb it is pronounced one way, and as an adjective or adverb it is pronounced another way. As a noun both pronunciations exist, but they have different meanings.
    I am not a teacher

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Without a close

    To clarify, in this case the last consonant is /s/; in the other meaning (ending/termination/...) the last consonant is /z/.

    I'm surprised you didn't ask about 'loosed its tongue'. Well done - but do ask if necessary.

    b
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