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    #1

    meaning of "to taste" in recipes

    Dear all,

    I used to think that "to taste" in recipes refers to a subjectively determined amount of a certain ingredient. So it's either written with this vague instruction or with a specified amount, such as this recipe here:

    http://www.meatlessmonday.com/recipe...maple-oatmeal/

    But recently I also read some recipes that say "to taste" and a specified amount at the same time, such as "2-3 tablespoons maple syrup , to taste" in this recipe:

    http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/f...yKQ3Jxi7bH6.97

    Now I'm confused about what "to taste" means in recipes. Does it always refer to the amount of a certain ingredient? Can it have other meanings?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: meaning of "to taste" in recipes

    It means "to your taste". So, "2 to 3 tablespoons" means a minimum of two and a maximum of three according to your preference.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: meaning of "to taste" in recipes

    It suggests that the writer of the recipe thinks that less than 2 is not enough and more than 3 is too much. If you love maple, you could still add more. If you hate maple, you could perhaps leave it out altogether.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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