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  1. #1

    Question World Cup

    The World Cup has kicked off,while enjoying the game ,as a chinese ,I`m wondering are there some special words for football games? Is there a word that means one team beat the other by 2-0 or 3-0 or X-0?

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    #2

    Re: World Cup

    Not really. If they win by 3 goals or more, they thrash the other team (= beat very easily)

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: World Cup

    I don't know if they use this in British English, but if one team was scoreless (their final score was zero), we often say they were "skunked":


    The Tigers skunked the Cardinals, 2-0.


    Sometimes reading the sports page is like reading a thesaurus - there are so many different words and phrases used to describe the final score: Memphis trounced Arkansas, the Bulls pummeled the Bucks, Georgia was routed by Georgia Tech, Ohio State upset third-ranked Michigan, etc.
    Last edited by Ouisch; 16-Jun-2006 at 16:50.

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    #4

    Re: World Cup

    I haven't heard 'skunked' in the UK.


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    #5

    Re: World Cup

    It's called "shut-out." (Really wonder why no one seemed to have come up with this easy one.)

    By the way, your sentences should read like these: The World Cup has kicked off. While enjoying the games, as a Chinese, I am wondering whether there are some special terms in soccer games? Is there a word that means one team beat the other by 2-0 or 3-0 or X-0? (I'm a Chinese, too, and English is my late second language.)

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