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    #1

    better than 'before'

    Hi,

    'We can do better than before.'

    Is the above sentence correct with the usage of 'better than' followed by 'before'? Usually, (better) than is followed by a noun / pronoun, but here, 'before', an adverb, is used. Is it fine? If so, please explain the sentence structure.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by vpkannan; 24-Jan-2016 at 08:51.

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    #2

    Re: better than 'before'

    Your sentence is fine.

    Before can be used in the following ways:
    as a conjunction (connecting two clauses): Think carefully before you choose.
    as a preposition (followed by a noun): We’ll finish the project before Christmas.
    as an adverb (without a following noun): I’d met him once before.
    (Macmillan)

  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: better than 'before'

    We can do better than (we could) before.


    'we could' is implied.


  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: better than 'before'

    I think 'than' can also sometimes be followed by an adjective, as in 'more dead than alive'.
    I am not a teacher.

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