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    #1

    Verb "buck"

    I have never before used the word "buck", and now I have written a few sentences using it as an exercise. Would you please correct my mistakes?

    1. John went on holiday to Span to buck himself up after his divorce.
    2. Before a date, I drank a glass of beer to buck myself up.
    3. The jockey tried to pat the horse, but it bucked and neighed.
    4. When Gina came out of hospital her family threw a party to buck her up.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Verb "buck"

    I have to be honest: I rarely hear "buck someone up." It's usually used as an imperative: C'mon, buck up! It's not that bad.
    You usually say it (in my experience) when someone seems upset about something that should be easy to rebound from - like throwing a gutter ball or striking out in baseball. I wouldn't tell someone who just got out of the hospital to "buck up" for example.

    3 is okay. That's physical.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Verb "buck"

    They all look good to me.

    Now where's my beer?

  3. teechar's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Verb "buck"

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post
    1. John went on holiday to Spain to buck himself up after his divorce.
    Nos. 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate the same meaning.

    You're also likely to hear "buck the trend" on the news.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Verb "buck"

    Barb makes a good point. You might use "cheer up" instead of "buck up" in your examples.

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