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    #1

    Question Place of 'however'

    1. “It has, however, been proved that…”
    2. “It has been, however, proved that…”
    3. “It has been proved, however, that…”
    Which one is correct?

    Thanks in advance,
    Nyggus

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    #2

    Re: Place of 'however'

    1. “It has, however, been proved that…”(correct) (however - nevertheless)
    2. “It has been, however, proved that…”(incorrect)
    3. “It has been proved, however, that…” However here could mean 'in whatever way'

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: Place of 'however'

    Adverbial expletives or interrupters can appear nearly anywhere within a sentence. The word or phrase that follows tends to carry slightly more emphasis.

    EX “It, however, has been proved that…”
    1. “It has, however, been proved that…”
    2. “It has been, however, proved that…”
    3. “It has been proved, however, that…”

    Interrupters are not privy to closed constituents, e.g., determiner + noun; adjective + noun; preposition + noun, and so on.

    *The, however, plane was late.
    *She wants them for her, however, father.
    *They sent the package to, however, the wrong address.

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    #4

    Re: Place of 'however'

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Interrupters are not privy to closed constituents, e.g., determiner + noun; adjective + noun; preposition + noun, and so on.
    But can I split an infinitive with "however"?


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    #5

    Re: Place of 'however'

    Quote Originally Posted by dihen
    But can I split an infinitive with "however"?
    No, you cannot. "To" followed by the infinitive verb form is closed.

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    #6

    Re: Place of 'however'

    _
    Last edited by dihen; 17-Jun-2006 at 15:38.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: Place of 'however'

    You could ... Native speakers certainly do it, but it's not the standard way of doing things. Linguistically, the to-infinitive phrase is pretty much open, which is why speakers tend to split it now and then; e.g., to boldly go ...; I wanted to, however, say that ...


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    #8

    Re: Place of 'however'

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    You could ... Native speakers certainly do it, but it's not the standard way of doing things. Linguistically, the to-infinitive phrase is pretty much open, which is why speakers tend to split it now and then; e.g., to boldly go ...; I wanted to, however, say that ...
    Hmm, I think I'd disagree actually. I said it's a closed form. I didn't say you couldn't split the infinitive - that's a different subject.

    As you said, Casiopea, you can't interrupt a dative preposition and its noun with a parenthetic clause: for example, "I gave the doll to, however, Mary."

    You can, though, modify the noun with an adjective inside the dative phrase: for example, "I gave the doll to cheeky Mary."

    Similarly, you can modify (despite misconceptions to the contrary) the base verb form within an infinitive phrase with an adverb: for example, "I want to boldly go..."

    You cannot, though, interrupt the infinitive phrase: for example, "I want to, however, boldly go..."

    The reason is exactly the same in both cases - they are closed forms.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: Place of 'however'

    Ah, yes, but we are talking about colloquial/non-standard usage, right? There's a fuzzy boundary here: quasi,

    open: [want to] + [VERB] <split infinitive>
    closed: [want] + [to VERB]

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