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    #1

    in a few minutes he stopped

    Hi,

    According to Longman Dictionary (http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/in_1):

    after followed by a time period is more often used to talk about past events
    After a few minutes he stopped.

    in
    followed by a time period is more often used to talk about future events
    • He'll be here in a few minutes.

    However, I've come across 'in' in a past structure in the book Jesus of the Future by Alexander C. Parker (page 188):

    ... JESUS leaned toward him and started to talk to him in a very low voice, so only that man could hear what was being said; in a few minutes HE stoppped in front of another leader and said ...

    I feel confused. Could you please tell me which one I should use?

    Thanks.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in a few minutes he stopped

    Use "after".
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #3

    Re: in a few minutes he stopped

    Your reference does say "more often" in both entries. Going with the majority is a safe bet.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in a few minutes he stopped

    I find the author's use of "in" unnatural.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: in a few minutes he stopped

    But more often does not mean that this is the only possible meaning. I agree that this is an odd sentence, though.

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