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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    Anybody see

    Anybody see him?

    Nobody move a muscle.

    We use verbs with s at the end when talking about third person. Are these sentences correct? If yes then, please tell where to use verb without s while talking about third person.

  2. kilroy65's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Anybody see

    "Anybody see him?" -> "Does/Can anybody see him?"

    "Nobody move a muscle." sounds like a command, an imperative sentence. An exclamation mark would be more appropriate than a period.

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    #3

    Re: Anybody see

    Please tell me how to know when we have to use verbs without "s".

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Anybody see

    Always, except in the third person singular, present simple indicative affirmative form of lexical verbs.

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    #5

    Re: Anybody see

    "Anybody see him?" -- this is correct. Either in present or past tense. Why? I can tell you as a native speaker that we use "anybody" as a collective noun to imply "we". It is never used as "Anybody sees" as in 3rd person singular.

    Hope that helps
    "not a teacher, but I am native expert speaker"

  5. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Anybody see

    Quote Originally Posted by allenman View Post
    "Anybody see him?" -- this is correct. Either in present or past tense. Why? I can tell you as a native speaker that we use "anybody" as a collective noun to imply "we".
    No, we do not use it in that way. We simply omit the auxiliary DO, as kilroy suggested.
    I am native expert speaker"
    Interesting,

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    #7

    Re: Anybody see

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    The OP has already received excellent answers. I only wanted to expand a bit on the topic, for I am sure that many learners find this matter rather confusing.

    I have made up two sentences:

    1. Everybody stands up when the Queen enters the room.
    2. Everybody stand up when I enter!''

    As you, dear learners, can see, #1 uses "s" (the indicative) because it is a fact: Everyone DOES stand up whenever Her Majesty comes into a room.

    In #2, however, that is NOT a fact. It means something like: "I demand that everyone stand up when I enter the room." It is NOT a fact. It is only my demand or wish. So we do NOT use the "s." (We use the so-called subjunctive form.)

    *****

    I have found an explanation from a world-famous scholar. It has really helped me. I am delighted to share it.

    Look at his example:


    Oh, please, someone go in and tell her."

    That scholar says this: "Any imperative [command] is virtually [actually] in the second person ["you"], even if [it is] seemingly addressed [said] to a 'third person' [such as "someone"]."

    In other words, the scholar says (that) that sentence actually means something like: "Oh, please, one of you present, go in and tell her."


    -- Otto Jespersen, Essentials of English Grammar (1933), page 148.

  6. Key Member
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    #8

    Thumbs up Re: Anybody see

    Okay when it's a kind of order or request then we don't use s for third person. Got it.

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