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    #1

    will feel

    "Nevertheless, Klopp will feel his side should have won." (BBC website.)

    Is there any reason why the simple future ("will feel") is chosen (in the above) to state about a past unfulfilled action? Is the author of the sentence not sure about the Klopp's feelings now?

    Thank you.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 31-Jan-2016 at 10:08. Reason: Removed formatting to make font readable
    I'm not a teacher and I'm not a native speaker of English.

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    #2

    Re: will feel

    The writer uses this expression to mean 'I think Klopp is disappointed that his team didn't win'.

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    #3

    Re: will feel

    Quote Originally Posted by tkacka15 View Post

    Is there any reason why the simple future ("will feel") is chosen?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Tkacka:

    Although you have already received the answer, I would like to contribute some ideas, for you have raised a very interesting point.

    1. I would like to very timidly suggest that maybe (maybe!) we are NOT dealing with the "simple future" in your sentence.

    2. As you know, "will" is a modal verb. So it can be used for many meanings.

    3. Here is what one scholar says. I will just report his findings, and let you decide for yourself.

    a. The word "will" is "often used to indicate a mere supposition [deduction]."

    "He is waiting for us downstairs; he will be wondering where we are."

    "You will have heard the rumor" ( = I suppose you have heard).

    -- Otto Jespersen, Essentials of English Grammar (1933), page 275.

    *****

    Only my thoughts: Perhaps this idea of supposition/ deduction/guessing could be more easily understood if we added one word to your sentence:

    "Klopp will probably feel his side should have won."
    Last edited by TheParser; 31-Jan-2016 at 16:02.

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