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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    nor should you

    Are these sentences correct:

    1) I don't know how much you know about this subject, and you shouldn't either.

    2) I don't know how much you know about this subject, and nor should you.

    The basic meaning is that I don't expect you to know about this subject.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: nor should you

    It doesn't make sense because it starts with "I don't know". The end of #2 makes it sound like you are saying "And you shouldn't know how much you know either!"

    You don't know much about this subject and nor should you. You've never studied it before.

    It would be simpler to say exactly what you said in your final sentence "I don't expect you to know much about this subject".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: nor should you

    Thank you very much, Emsr2d2,

    Does this one work:

    a) You don't know much about this subject and neither should you. You've never studied it before.


    I don't think it does. I think one needs the 'nor' and 'neither' won't do.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: nor should you

    You're right. Your intended meaning needs "nor".

    If there were a third person in the room, you could use the "neither" version if you directed the first part of the statement to person 1 and the second half to person 2. You would be suggesting that you don't expect either of them to know much about the subject.

    If you are simply trying to say that don't expect them to know much, I would start with "You probably don't know much ...". That leaves room for you to be proved wrong!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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