Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. beachboy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 844
    #1

    in spite of

    He bought the tickets, but he didn't watch the film.
    In spite of buying the tickets, he didn't watch the film.

    Could I also say "In spite of not watching the film, he bought the tickets", without a change in meaning? It sounds awkward to me.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #2

    Re: in spite of

    Your sentences with "In spite of" are incorrect. You could use "despite" in sentence #2. The third sentence is not possible.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  3. beachboy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 844
    #3

    Re: in spite of

    I thought "in spite of" and "despite" were synonyms....

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #4

    Re: in spite of

    No, they aren't.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  5. beachboy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 844
    #5

    Re: in spite of

    So how can I finish this sentence, and make it grammatically right and meaningful: "In spite of buying the tickets, ________________________"? I thought "in spite of" suggested contrast.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #6

    Re: in spite of

    You can't. As I said before, use "despite buying". Where did you find that sentence?
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  7. beachboy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 844
    #7

    Re: in spite of

    I just happened to come up with it. But I can't figure out the difference between "in spite of" and "despite", as some books say they're synonyms. So, I don't know how to use them. To my knoledge, I thought the preposition "in spite of" had the same meaning as the conjunction "although", so I could easily say " Although he bought the tickets, he didn't watch the film". But now I'm not sure....

  8. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #8

    Re: in spite of

    You can certainly use "although" in that sentence. You cannot use "in spite of buying".
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 803
    #9

    Re: in spite of

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    But I can't figure out the difference between "in spite of" and "despite", as some books say they're synonyms.

    Strange, my dictionaries and textbooks also say in spite of and dispite and despite of mean the same thing ...

    Like you, I thought they were synonyms.
    Not a Teacher

  9. beachboy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 844
    #10

    Re: in spite of

    I don't think "despite of" exists, but I still don't know the difference between the other two....

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] in spite of her losing/ in spite of having lost
    By Oceanlike in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29-Jan-2016, 12:27
  2. [Grammar] In spite of
    By beachboy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-Dec-2015, 15:53
  3. In spite of
    By beachboy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Feb-2010, 11:20
  4. Although, even though, though, despite, in spite of
    By mamboo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Nov-2008, 19:59
  5. although, in spite, however, though
    By jirikoo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2008, 12:48

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •