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    #1

    They don't know good food when they've seen it

    Hello everybody!


    This is my signature dish - the recipe fell into my lap years ago when I worked at one of the world's top restaurants - you wouldn't have heard of it.

    Mary

    Oh wouldn't I? Well, it has got a lot of chilli in it so it's not to everyone'staste.


    Peter

    Water! Water!

    Gordon
    Where's the fire? Where's the fire?

    Peter
    No fire... chilli... too much chilli. They don't like it...

    Gordon

    They don't know good food when they've seen it!

    Does the sentence at issue mean "They don't know whether or not the food that they are being served is good; they should taste it first"?

    Thank you.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish...a/elephant-ep8
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 07-Feb-2016 at 20:00. Reason: Correct formatting.

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: They don't know good food when they've seen it

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    the recipe fell into my lap
    That means that the person found the recipe accidentally, but it turned out to be a good find.

    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...omeone%27s+lap

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    #3

    Re: They don't know good food when they've seen it

    I regret to have to inform you but I do not think you have answered the question I put. I asked about the meaning of "They don't know good food when they've seen it!".

    Does the sentence at issue mean "They don't know whether or not the food that they are being served is good; they should taste it first"?

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: They don't know good food when they've seen it

    No, it means the speaker disagrees with their taste in food. He was probably disappointed that people didn't like the food he had gone to so much trouble to prepare. He took it personally that they didn't like it.

    ("Too much chili" probably means too many chili peppers.)

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: They don't know good food when they've seen it

    I find the use of the present perfect in that sentence unnatural. In BrE at least, it would be "They don't know good food when they see it!" It means that the person sometimes eats good food but doesn't recognise that it's good.

    BrE has a more expressive way of saying this. If someone regularly misses the fact that they have eaten something good, or they regularly fail to appreciate the quality of their food, I might say "You wouldn't know good food if it jumped up and bit you!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: They don't know good food when they've seen it

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    I regret to have to inform you but I do not think you have answered the question I put.
    Before you get too pleased with yourself, you should look back at the emboldened part of the text, which is what Teechar responded to correctly. I regret to have to inform you that the fault is not Teechar's. You have posted a phrase that is emboldened as well as something in the title, so it is not clear what your question is. Post a clear question and you'll get a clear answer. Post a sloppy, messy question with alternative questions asked by formatting, and someone may think that the emboldened part is what is being asked about.

    PS Try right-clicking and choosing post as plain text to avoid getting it wrong next time. It will remove formatting.

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