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    #1

    regrets buying

    In the following grammar exercise, I know the answer is ‘buying’ but I don’t understand the reason for it.

    Travis regrets buying that expensive pair of gloves the moment he reached home.

    Thank you for teaching me!

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: regrets buying

    The gerund phrase functions as a noun, which the transitive verb 'regret' takes as its direct object.

    I think 'regrets' does not agree with 'reached'.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: regrets buying

    Matthew Wai is right about the tenses not matching. You could say either:

    1) Travis regretted buying that pair of gloves the moment he reached home.
    2) Travis regrets buying that pair of gloves the moment he reaches home. (This would only work in a narrative in which the writer has chosen to use the present tense to indicate an imaginary situation or something that has already happened. Some authors always write in the present tense.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: regrets buying

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    or something that has already happened. Some authors always write in the present tense.)
    Yes, I notice that some writers tend to use the present tense in their writings even though it's clear that the actions are past. Is this a 'special' way of writing where present tense is used for things that have already happened?

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    #5

    Re: regrets buying

    Yes, it's a matter of writing style.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: regrets buying

    'When we are telling a story or describing things that have happened to us, we often use present tenses (even though the events are in the past) in order to sound more interesting and dramatic.'── quoted from http://www.znanje.org/knjige/english...prescontxt.htm
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    #7

    Re: regrets buying

    Quote Originally Posted by Oceanlike View Post
    Yes, I notice that some writers tend to use the present tense in their writings even though it's clear that the actions are past. Is this a 'special' way of writing where present tense is used for things that have already happened?
    It's called the "historical present".
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: regrets buying

    I personally find historical present exhausting to read after a short time.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: regrets buying

    I do too, but I make an exception for Damon Runyon. I still occasionally re-read his stories with pleasure. I recommend that learners do not try to read Runyon; he is not a good model. .

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    #10

    Re: regrets buying

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It's called the "historical present".
    I wish things could be kept simple LOL....if it's past, then just use past-related tenses; if it's present, then use present.

    'Historical present' sounds like an oxymoron to me

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