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    #1

    usage of more seriously as a substitute for more severely

    According to Longman Dictionary, severe problems, injuries, illnesses, and so on are very bad. The same dictionary explains that serious situations, problems, accidents and so on are extremely bad or dangerous.

    These two adjectives have similar meanings. I want to use "more seriously" as a substitute for "more severely" in a sentence to describe a hair loss problem.

    (1) This is my original sentence when I use "serious" as an adjective.

    When I experience stress, I have a more serious hair loss problem.

    (2) Now, I want to use the word as an adverb.

    Stress causes me to lose my hair more seriously than when I am stress-free.

    Am I using "more seriously" correctly in the second sentence? Please explain this. Thank you very much.

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    #2

    Re: usage of more seriously as a substitute for more severely

    Both are OK. But I prefer them to be simpler as follows:

    1. When I experience stress, my hair loss problem becomes more serious/severe.

    2. Stress causes me to lose more hair.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: usage of more seriously as a substitute for more severely

    I'd say you need 'severe'. Losing one tenth of your hair isn't necessarily more serious than losing one twentieth. That would depend on the consequences, and your attitude to it. But it is more severe by definition.
    Last edited by Raymott; 13-Feb-2016 at 16:23. Reason: typo

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