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      • Native Language:
      • Polish
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      • Poland
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    • Join Date: Jan 2006
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    #1

    Question Wherein

    Hi:
    Could we say that ‘wherein’=’in which’? For instance, consider the two sentences:
    1. “We have applied the method to analyze the experiment wherein winter wheat was investigated as an effect of…”
    2. “We have applied the method to analyze the experiment in which winter wheat was investigated as an effect of…”

    Is the first sentence ok, that is, is it not clumsy? Is the meaning of both sentences the same?
    Thanks in advance,
    Nyggus


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #2

    Re: Wherein

    They mean the same, but "wherein" is somewhat archaic. It would be acceptable in a scientific paper, but I would still prefer 'in which' - why use archaic forms when there is a perfectly good alternative?

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      • England
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      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    #3

    Re: Wherein

    The first few pages of googles for "wherein" show mostly mis- or humorous use.

    The mock chapter heading seems to be a favourite form, e.g.

    "Chapter 6: Wherein MrQ Has His Comeuppance"

    On a related subject, I've noticed a resurgence in the use of "whereby" of late, especially by public figures in radio interviews (and often incorrectly).

    MrP

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