Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Jan 2015
    • Posts: 762
    #1

    Go

    Hi,


    Is "go" both a transitive and an intransitive verb? Or is it only an intransitive verb?

  1. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,314
    #2

    Re: Go

    It's intransitive.
    I am not a teacher

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,514
    #3

    Re: Go

    It is both. Click here.

    Untaught, please bookmark this site for future reference.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Jan 2015
    • Posts: 762
    #4

    Re: Go

    Thank you, Rover.

    Actually, I had a look at Mac Millan Dictionary before posting my query. But I read only 12 definitions. Now I read all the definitions of it and I found it was also a transitive verb when I read the 14th definition.

    Cows go 'moo'.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #5

    Re: Go

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Untaught:

    Great question.

    Please look at this sentence: "The cow has gone dry."

    Do you think the verb "go" in that sentence is transitive or intransitive?

    Well, do you think that the word "dry" is an object?

    A great scholar says that "dry" is actually a complement. (It completes the meaning of "The cow has gone.")


    I think that you have probably guessed how that scholar classifies "go" in that sentence.

    It is, he says, a copula or linking verb.


    I have made up this sentence: "He goes berserk [crazy] whenever anyone disagrees with his opinions."

    *****


    That scholar says that "go" is a regular verb in "The cow has run into the barn." (I believe that it is being used in an intransitive sense in that sentence. There is no object.)



    -- George Oliver Curme, A Grammar of the English Language (1931), Vol.1, pages 26 -27.
    Last edited by TheParser; 19-Feb-2016 at 14:08.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •