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  1. ana laura
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    #1

    Exclamation from a text...

    Hello,

    these following sentences are from a text which talks about problems at marriage and researchers who try to find answers. I am asked to explain their meaning in english.

    1) '... I didn't feel bold enough to get my feet wet and try it myself until 1962.'
    2) '... family therapy were coming ashore in the fifties...'
    3) '... some experts are not following the new tide.'
    4)' ... they create a psychological climate of helpless misery.'
    5) '... some children may appear more disturbed in the early years after the break-up before they 'bounce back'. (what's 'bounce back'?)

    Thank you very very very very much.


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #2

    Re: from a text...

    Quote Originally Posted by ana laura
    Hello,
    these following sentences are from a text which talks about problems at marriage and researchers who try to find answers. I am asked to explain their meaning in english.
    1) '... I didn't feel bold enough to get my feet wet and try it myself until 1962.'
    2) '... family therapy were coming ashore in the fifties...'
    3) '... some experts are not following the new tide.'
    4)' ... they create a psychological climate of helpless misery.'
    5) '... some children may appear more disturbed in the early years after the break-up before they 'bounce back'. (what's 'bounce back'?)
    Thank you very very very very much.
    There is a recurring metaphor of the seashore here. Bear this in mind.

    1) "Get my feet wet" is a metaphor for going ahead and actually doing something. When you are wading into the sea, it takes some courage to initially enter the water - i.e. 'get your feet wet'. A similar common metaphor is 'take the plunge'.

    2) "Coming ashore" simply means 'starting to appear'. It suggests the image of objects washing onto the shore during a sea tide.

    3) A 'new tide' is a modern trend of events, like a fresh tide at sea is a new beginning. You often hear the similar metaphor 'new wave' in this context - as in "They were swept away by the new wave of technology."

    4) A 'climate' is a prevailing general background - for example, "There was a climate of change in the industry."

    5) "Bounce back" means "recover" - when you press a rubbery substance, for example, it will 'bounce back' to its original shape. So the children are initially disturbed by their parents' break-up, but they eventually recover ('bounce back').

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