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    #1

    Fit right


    Hello,

    Is fit right in an idiomatic expression?
    Eg., He is one of the mature students on my course. He's fit right in though, he's got more friends than most of us.

    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: Fit right

    "Fit in" is. The "right" is a modifier describing how easily he fit in.

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    #3

    Re: Fit right

    I have not come across that expression used in such a context.

    I would write the second sentence as follow:

    He fits in very well with the rest, so he has more friends than most of us.

    I am not a teacher.

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Fit right

    "He fits right in" is certainly a common expression. It might be used to refer to somebody who although a relative newcomer to the place behaves as if he might have been there for a long time.

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    #5

    Re: Fit right

    He's fit right in ("He has fit", present perfect) and He fits right in (present simple) are both common and idiomatic.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Fit right

    Quote Originally Posted by sondra View Post

    Hello,

    Is fit right in an idiomatic expression?
    Eg., He is one of the mature students on my course. He's fit right in though, he's got more friends than most of us.

    Thank you!
    e.g., He is one of the more mature students in my course. He fits right in though; he's got more friends than most of us.

    Or, He's fit right in with 's as "has" not "is." (Thanks, goes, I had thought it was "is" and was going to say it was wrong, but of course, the present perfect would work as well.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: Fit right

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    e.g., He is one of the more mature students in my course. He fits right in though; he's got more friends than most of us.

    Or, He's fit right in with 's as "has" not "is." (Thanks, goes, I had thought it was "is" and was going to say it was wrong, but of course, the present perfect would work as well.)
    Oh, it should be ''in'' and not ''on''. Or are both acceptable?

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Fit right

    In BrE, it's "on my course". It would be "in my class".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Fit right

    Thanks, ems, I didn't know that.
    The preposition differences between BrE and AmE continue to befuddle me.
    In my class, in my course - both "in" in AmE.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #10

    Re: Fit right

    In AmE, we may be "on a course" of antibiotics, but we would be "in a course" at a school.

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