Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 204
    #1

    Subordinate clauses

    Hello,

    I have been studying clauses for several days now, and I am still not sure what qualifies as a complete thought.I have seen several subordinate clauses which
    have a subject and a verb, and to me, they make a complete sense.I have gone
    through every website, and I am still not sure where to use "comma" and where I should not.

    The most annoying thing is that we use comma before "but" and "and" in some cases and leave it out in other.

    B) "When using a coordinating conjunction to connect two items, do not use a comma." What does item refer to?

    I would really appreciate it if you could clear this up with some examples.

    Thanks for taking time to view my post.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,348
    #2

    Re: Subordinate clauses

    I don't have time to answer your question now, sorry. But I'll give you a quick tip: punctuation marks at the end of a word require a single space before the first letter of the next word.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 11,085
    #3

    Re: Subordinate clauses

    A sentence (main clause) can stand on its own, but a subordinate clause cannot.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #4

    Re: Subordinate clauses

    Quote Originally Posted by gurpreetgill4u View Post

    I have seen several subordinate clauses which
    have a subject and a verb, and to me, they make a complete sense.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Gurpreetgill:

    I believe that it is accurate to say that ALL subordinate clauses have a subject and a verb. But do they make complete sense by themselves?

    I have made up these sentences (the subordinate clause is underlined):

    1. More people would like him if he were not so arrogant.

    a. If you went up to a stranger on the street and said, "If he were not so arrogant," the stranger would probably reply, "What are you talking about?" Some people might even quickly walk away from you in fright!
    b. If you went up to a stranger and said the main clause "More people would respect him," maybe the stranger would simply say "That's nice."

    2. When [you are] interviewing for a job, do not chew gum.
    Do not chew gum when interviewing for a job.

    How would you feel if a stranger came up to you and suddenly said, "When interviewing for a job"?

    Would you consider that what s/he was saying made "complete sense"?

    On the other hand, if s/he said the main clause "Do not chew gum," you might answer: "OK, I won't."

    That is why subordinate clauses are called sub[under]ordinate clauses. They depend on the main clause to make complete sense.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 26-Feb-2016 at 14:55. Reason: fixed formatting

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #5

    Re: Subordinate clauses

    I can't support the "accost strangers on the street with sentences or sentence fragments and judge from their reaction whether it's a complete thought" line of argument.

    There are a number of words that signal that you have a subordinate clause. They are the "subordinate conjunctions" and you can find some here: https://www.usingenglish.com/glossar...njunction.html

    Your "two items" question: I would interpret this to mean two things of the same type.
    I like the Tigers and the Mets.
    I spent my days swimming and reading by the beach.
    I took me two hours to fold the laundry and put it all away.

    The old rule was that if you had two independent clauses joined by an "and" or "or" you should use a comma.
    I folded the laundry, and I put it all away.
    These days, that is often ignored in shorter sentences like the one above.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 11,085
    #6

    Re: Subordinate clauses

    I'm not going to ask total strangers about subordinate clauses anytime soon.


  4. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 10,011
    #7

    Re: Subordinate clauses

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I can't support the "accost strangers on the street with sentences or sentence fragments and judge from their reaction whether it's a complete thought" line of argument.
    Quite. 'He saw it the following day' is an independent clause, not a subordinate one, but it is utterly meaningless to an accosted stranger, or indeed to anyone, without knowledge of the context in which it is uttered.

Similar Threads

  1. Pronouns in main clauses/subordinate clauses?
    By blissful in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2012, 01:05
  2. [Grammar] Subordinate clauses dependent on other subordinate clauses
    By Waawe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 14-Mar-2010, 20:19
  3. subordinate clauses
    By beachboy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2008, 01:02
  4. subordinate clauses after conjunctions
    By whatever_love_means in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-Mar-2007, 01:10

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •