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    #1

    Lame/crippled

    Hi,

    "Lame" is used for the animal having difficulty walking.
    "Crippled" is used for the human being having difficulty walking.

    Am I right?

  1. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Lame/crippled

    I can say for sure that the word "lame" is widely used with people. Honestly, I think that the word "lame" is more common in phrases like "that's lame!" which means that something is not cool and people do not like it.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Lame/crippled

    These days, "crippled" is a very uncommon word to describe someone who can't walk. We use it almost metaphorically in things like "She was crippled with pain" but this has less to do with the person's ability to walk and more to do with a pain which is so bad that the sufferer can barely move (temporarily).

    People who can't walk are generally described as simply "disabled" although of course the term refers to many different physical problems.

    I should add that even "disabled" is considered by some to be unacceptable and derogatory. In the UK, for a while a few years ago, we were encouraged to use "differently-abled". It didn't catch on.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Lame/crippled

    "He is ambulatorily challenged."
    "He is limited locomotorily."
    "He has a gammy leg."

    I'm not sure which I'd prefer if I couldn't walk well. Whatever you choose, someone's going to be offended.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Lame/crippled

    Of the three physically impaired people I have known, none has ever been offended by the term "disabled". Having said that, I don't think any of them ever described themselves using the term. My cousin says she is "visually impaired" (she's not completely blind but has a vision-limiting condition) and two of my friends say, if it's relevant and necessary, "I have multiple sclerosis and I'm in a wheelchair".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Lame/crippled

    A young woman visiting the American state of Ohio told me she was shocked to see the word handicapped used to mark parking spaces and toilets here. The word seemed pejorative to her.

    Euphemism follows an entirely predictable path. A word commonly used to describe some kind of disadvantage becomes pejorative, or is perceived that way; the word is replaced with a seemingly neutral word; the new word starts to seem pejorative; the cycle repeats.
    I am not a teacher.

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