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  1. keannu's Avatar
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      • South Korea
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    #1

    ocuses on understanding instead of efficiency

    When someone asks us, “How does that work?” or “Why does that happen?” we tend to answer the question directly if we know the answer. After all, it is efficient. Another person asks a question; we provide the answer to the question. It is usually a win-win. The problem with this is that the direct approach can have an unintended consequence: the loss of confidence. Although the question wanted for an explanation, what the asker received was a statement of fact. Why does oil float on top of water in a glass? Relative density. What causes climate change? Increased CO2 in the atmosphere. Why does the ocean have tides? The moon. Giving direct, accurate, and factual answers may seem to solve the problem from the perspective of the answerer. But in reality, it can shut the asker down. A statement of fact with no other context puts the burden on the asker to take the next step. If the asker isn’t familiar with relative density or CO2, he or she is likely to move on rather than ask a follow-up question or probe for related ideas. Any hope of becoming a customer of that idea is lost. This is a failure in the form of a lost opportunity. Although direct answers are often needed and well-placed, they do not work universally. A skilled explainer learns to see the intent behind the question and formulate an answer that focuses on understanding instead of efficiency

    I can't understand why the underlined is "efficiency". Isn't the answer focused on understanding more efficient? Why are direct answers focusing on facts more effective?

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    #2

    Re: ocuses on understanding instead of efficiency

    Efficiency is giving the minimum input to get results. A brief answer such as "relative density" to explain why oil floats on water is said to be an efficient answer. But it does not produce the intended result which is for the questioner to understand the concept, if one is not educated in the subject. The answer should be tailored to the level of understanding of the questioner. Efficiency which does not achieve the intent or objective, is pointless.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: ocuses on understanding instead of efficiency

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post

    Why are direct answers focusing on facts more efficient? effective?
    .

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