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    #1

    What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    When you are using the date format, for example "1st month, 2nd month, 3rd month, 4th month.. etc." What do you call this in English? ("st", "nd", "rd")

    If you need to explain, 5th, 6th, 7th 8th and the rest.. is the rest only use "th"? or in the middle it need to repeat "nd, rd"? I need to know what is the correct way of using it. Thanks

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    #2

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    You're describing ordinal numbers, the number names we use when discussing the order of something.

    The ordinal name applies to the final one or two digits of an integer: first, eleventh, twenty-first, one hundred and eleventh; second, twelfth, twenty-second, one hundred and twelfth; third, thirteenth, twenty-third, one hundred and third; fourth, fourteenth, twenty-fourth, one hundred and fourth; etc.
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  1. Skrej's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewEnglish1 View Post
    When you are using the date format, for example "1st month, 2nd month, 3rd month, 4th month.. etc." What do you call this in English? ("st", "nd", "rd")

    There are referred to as 'ordinal' numbers. Regular numbers showing quantity are referred to as 'cardinal' numbers.

    Quote Originally Posted by NewEnglish1 View Post
    If you need to explain, 5th, 6th, 7th 8th and the rest.. is the rest only use "th"? or in the middle it need to repeat "nd, rd"? I need to know what is the correct way of using it. Thanks
    If the number ends in 1, 2, or 3, you'll use the corresponding 'st',' nd', or 'rd'. Otherwise use 'th'.

    Examples:
    1st
    2nd
    3rd
    4th
    10th
    20th
    100th
    101st
    102nd
    103rd
    104th
    110th
    120th
    751st
    3,202nd
    433rd
    1,527th
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    #4

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    If the number ends in 1, 2, or 3, you'll use the corresponding 'st',' nd', or 'rd'. Otherwise use 'th'.
    The ordinals in the low teens, and compounds ending in those numbers, don't follow that pattern.
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    #5

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    The ordinals in the low teens, and compounds ending in those numbers, don't follow that pattern.
    Hi, I am not too sure what do you mean, if the number is 1092, so not suppose to use "nd"?

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    1,092 does not end in a low teen. In the highly unlikely event that you'll ever need the ordinal, it's a/one thousand and ninety-second, 1,092nd.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    No, 1092nd is correct. The "low teens" are, for me, 13 and 14 and they follow the normal rule and are 13th and 14th.

    I can only assume GoesStation was referring, for example, to the number 11 which ends in a "1" but is not followed by "st" and the number 12 which ends in a "2" but is not followed by "nd".

    11th (111th, 211th etc).
    12th 112th, 212th, etc).

    In all other situations, a "1" is followed by "st" and a "2" is followed by "nd".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewEnglish1 View Post
    Hi, I am not too sure what do you mean, if the number is 1092, so not suppose to use "nd"?
    The low teens I referred to are 11, 12, and 13. They end in 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Their ordinals all end in th. The pattern suggested in post #3 would have them end in "'st',' nd', or 'rd'".

    The correct rule is:

    If the number ends in 11, 12, or 13, its ordinal ends in th. Otherwise, if it ends in 1, 2, or 3, use the corresponding st, nd, or rd. All other ordinals use th.
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    #9

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    Apologies, I missed out 13 in my last post. However, I don't refer to 11 or 12 as low teens. For something to be a low teen, the number needs to end in "-teen". It doesn't refer to a number that's simply over ten. Kids don't become "teens" until their 13th birthday, not their 11th birthday. That's the case in BrE, at least.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: What is the correct Date "th, st" format?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Apologies, I missed out 13 in my last post. However, I don't refer to 11 or 12 as low teens. For something to be a low teen, the number needs to end in "-teen". It doesn't refer to a number that's simply over ten. Kids don't become "teens" until their 13th birthday, not their 11th birthday. That's the case in BrE, at least.
    Agreed, and it's the same in AmE. I should have specified what I meant: eleven, twelve and thirteen.
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