Poll: If someone's in the pink,

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    #1


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #2

    Re: In the pink

    to be in the pink means being healthy, as opposed to be as white as a sheet, id est, being pale.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #3

    Re: In the pink

    So can we use such " in the pink ";

    - How are you ?
    - I am in the pink, you ?

    like this...

  1. #4

    Re: In the pink

    Sarah,
    No, you can't use it in this way. Generally you use the expression when talking about a third person who is looking well ie., he's in the pink.


    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #5

    Re: In the pink

    ok i got that idiom thnx mauren


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #6

    Re: In the pink

    in the pink (old-fashioned, informal) in good health

    --------------------------------------------

    in the pink
    informal + old-fashioned : in very good health
    ▪ Regular exercise helped to keep her in the pink (of good health).


  2. Lynxear's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: In the pink

    Quote Originally Posted by _sahra_ View Post
    So can we use such " in the pink ";

    - How are you ?
    - I am in the pink, you ?

    like this...
    yes... you could say it that way. It can be used for the first person, second person or third person. It is a bit old fashioned tough and is not used much in Canadian English.

    A similar idiom would be "on the right side of the daisies".

    "You are looking fine today!", she said.

    " Yeah, at least I'm on the right side of the daisies." he replied


    Perhaps the boy was feeling very sick for a while and the girl is commenting on his looking healthy. The boy's reply is a humourous way of saying that he is still alive. The idiom comes from the fact that daises are often used as flowers on a grave. If you are dead you are buried under the daisies but if you are alive you are above the daisies. So "being on the right side of the daisies" means you haven't died yet.

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